Yoenis Cespedes reaches “demigod” status, will be A’s starting center fielder over Coco Crisp

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As soon as the A’s signed Yoenis Cespedes for $36 million and started talking about him as an option in center field Coco Crisp made it clear that he wouldn’t be giving up the position without a fight, saying: “Unless he’s a demigod come down from the heavens, no one is going to outshine me in center field.”

I guess that means Cespedes is officially a demigod, because the A’s announced that he’ll be the starting center fielder for their season-opening games in Japan and Crisp will shift to left field.

Crisp has plenty of corner outfield experience, so that won’t be an issue, but he’s generally rated very well defensively in center field and re-signed with the A’s in part because he believed they’d continue to start him there. Well, that and the $18 million.

Many of the initial scouting reports on Cespedes suggested he’d be better in right field, but the A’s will use Josh Reddick there while trusting what little they’ve seen of Cespedes’s range in person.

Behold: The new Marlins logo

Marlins
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The Marlins have not released their new uniform design — at least not yet — but they did release their new logo today. That’s it up top. It’s not too bad? Here’s the secondary logo, which you could maybe imagine on a cap?

The logo appears at the end of the video below which is, until the final few seconds, not about baseball at all. It’s about Miami. A “this is our town” promotional thing which takes you on a tour and shows you people and the culture of the city.

A lot of times when sports teams do this stuff it seems somewhat contrived, but I think it’s pretty cool here. The Marlins have almost never sent much of a “we are a part of our community” message. Jeff Loria lived in New York for Pete’s sake and, of course, they infamously consider themselves a foreign corporation for legal purposes. Before this, the most they ever seemed to want out of Miami is tax subsidies and to be left the hell alone.

You can’t just market your way into a community — and the Marlins have a long way to go before they can earn back any sort of trust from baseball fans in Miami —  but the fact that they are at least trying to make themselves part of the Miami community is probably worth something.

Anyway: