Little Leaguers have to return money to a strip club

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No, it’s not because they robbed the place. That would be a way better story. This one is merely OK.

In a tale as old as time, a bunch of strippers try to help a bunch of kids and a bunch of fuddy duddies get all mad.  From Los Angeles, where a club called “Jet Strip” was just trying to be neighborly, and gave a $1,200 donation to the Lennox Little League:

The financially troubled Lennox Little League is returning a $1,200 donation offered to it by a strip club, a day after a Daily Breeze story about the contribution spread to other media outlets across the country … “We kind of looked at the whole situation, and we all feel it’s the right thing to do,” league President Roberto Aguirre said Tuesday.

Once again, thinking of the children does nothing but hurt the children. Buncha prudes.

Ah, I’m probably overreacting. Based on the article, as people took to their fainting couches over a strip club giving money to a baseball league, several other businesses — most likely upstanding corporate citizens like payday lending stores, investment banks and mortgage companies — chipped money in to make up. So no harm, no foul.

But seriously, dudes: it’s just money. It’s not like they were giving out lap dances or anything. Which would also be a much better story than this one.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.