Halladay brushes off questions about his health, velocity

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Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com spoke with Roy Halladay about the report of his diminished velocity and the speculation that maybe he has a physical problem.  Halladay ain’t having it. First on the idea of any health problems:

“Yeah, I heard about that … Poor reporting on the extreme end of poor reporting. It couldn’t be further from the truth.”

To be fair to Ken Rosenthal, who wrote the article to which Halladay refers, he wasn’t reporting that Halladay had health problems. He quoted a scout who speculated it.  Whatever the case, however, you take the player’s word for it unless and until the information at hand contradicts it. Halladay’s health is fine.

As for the velocity, Halladay blames age:

“Yeah, I’m 34 and 2,500 innings. It does take a while to get going. I don’t pay attention to that. The older you get, the more you throw, the longer it takes you to get yourself going … It’s not unusual. When you get older, it takes you longer. The more innings you throw the more it takes to get yourself going again.”

I have a very strong feeling that this will be forgotten about — and laughed about if it is remembered — come the end of the month.  But given the injuries to Howard and Utley, the rotation, once again, has to be stellar. So it’s not totally unreasonable to get mildly freaked about Halladay at the moment.  As long as it stays mild.

Video: Javier Báez jukes David Freese to avoid tag at first base

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Cubs shortstop Javier Báez pulled off one of the best jukes you’ll see, avoiding the tag from David Freese on a play at first base in the second inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Dodgers. Báez barely made contact with a Kenta Maeda pitch well outside the strike zone, tapping it towards Freese. Báez halted his momentum, juking Freese while he attempted to apply the tag, then dove into first base.

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts attempted to argue that Báez went out of the baseline, but the umpires’ no-call stood and Báez had himself a single. He would end up stranded on base, unfortunately for him and the Cubs.