What ever is wrong with Roy Halladay?

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Roy Halladay gave up a homer to Alex Rodriguez in his first spring start, which is fine because that’s Alex Rodriguez, the active major league leader in home runs.

In his second spring start, Halladay gave up two homers to Eric Patterson, a journeyman most famous for being the younger brother of a former top prospect turned journeyman.

In his third spring start, Halladay gave up two more homers, these to a Twins team that wasn’t hitting anyone this spring. Granted, they did come off the bats of better hitters than Patterson: Josh Willingham hit the first, with prospect Chris Parmelee delivering the second.

Add it up and Halladay has allowed five homers in 7 2/3 innings this spring. That’s one more than he allowed in his final 19 starts of 2011 (and, by the way, nine of those 19 starts lasted longer than 7 2/3 innings).

So, what’s wrong with Roy Halladay? Probably nothing. Still, this isn’t like him in the least. Not typically a slow starter, he made it through last spring allowing a total of one run in 21 2/3 innings. He did give up five homers in his final spring with the Jays in 2009, but that was spread over 33 innings and he ended up with a 3.27 ERA.

The current reports suggest Halladay’s velocity is just fine. His location obviously isn’t, but he’ll have a couple of more starts with which to sort that out. If he’s still getting lit up at the end of the spring, there will be some reason for concern. Right now, there isn’t.

Orioles CEO, brother agree to dismiss legal dispute

Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports
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Baltimore Orioles CEO John Angelos and his brother Lou have agreed to end their fight over a lawsuit in which Lou accused John of seizing control of the team in defiance of their father Peter’s wishes.

Lou Angelos sued John last year, claiming John took control of the Orioles at his expense. Georgia Angelos, their mother, also was named as a defendant.

In a Friday court filing in the case, John, Lou, Georgia and Peter Angelos called on “all claims, including all counterclaims and defenses, asserted therein be dismissed with prejudice in their entirety.”

“The Parties also withdraw and terminate all pending motions submitted in these actions,” the filing said.

Peter Angelos became the Orioles’ owner in 1993, but his public role has diminished in recent years and he turned 93 last year. According to the suit, he had surgery after his aortic valve failed in 2017.

Lou Angelos accused John of trying to take control of Peter Angelos’ assets and manipulating Georgia Angelos. The lawsuit was one of a handful of off-field issues looming over the Orioles this offseason. The team also has a lease at Camden Yards that expires at the end of the year.