Chipper Jones: “I don’t know if I can make it through this year”

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Chipper Jones has hinted at retirement on numerous occasions over the past couple of seasons, but it’s hard to find a time where he was more gloomy about his outlook than he was earlier today.

After going hitless in three at-bats against the Cardinals to drop to 0-for-8 during Grapefruit League action, Jones told David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that he’s not sure how much longer his body will hold up.

“Tomorrow might be my last day,” he said “I don’t know. I don’t really focus on it that much. The body is starting to tell me every morning when I wake up that it’s getting close. I’m signed through the end of this year. If I play in a certain amount of games, I got an option for next year. I don’t know what next year entails. I don’t know if I can make it through this year.”

Jones, who turns 40 next month, acknowledged that his right knee is hurting more than he thought it would. This is the same knee which required arthroscopic surgery last July. And that’s not a good sign.

Jones is owed $14 million this season in the final guaranteed year of a three-year, $42 million contract. His deal includes a $7 million club option for 2013 which vests automatically if he plays at least 123 games this season. The future Hall of Famer appeared in 126 games last season while batting .275/.344/.470 with 18 homers, 70 RBI and an .814 OPS.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.