Tommy Hanson has fun in abbreviated spring debut

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Pitching with a new delivery and a damaged shoulder that didn’t require surgery, Tommy Hanson gave up three runs — two earned — in one-plus innings Sunday against the Blue Jays in his spring debut.

Hanson turned in a one-two-three first, but he didn’t retire any of the four hitters he faced in the second before a rain delay halted his outing. Some of that was the defense’s fault, as Freddie Freeman committed an error behind him. Some of it was his fault, like when he gave up a two-run homer to one of baseball’s worst hitters in Jeff Mathis.

“The first inning was a lot more fun than the second,” Hanson told MLB.com. “I was getting balls that were soaked and wet and the mound was drenched. But it was still fun. When I was out there, I was just laughing about it because I was glad to be back out there on the mound. It was fun to compete again. It was one of those conditions where I didn’t really care what happened because it didn’t matter. It was almost like I was a little kid playing in the rain again.”

Hanson missed the final two months of last season and was diagnosed with a minor tear in his rotator cuff. The new delivery he’s working with this spring was designed to make him quicker to the plate, but it’s also supposed to be easier on his shoulder.

“I felt great,” Hanson said. “Obviously, my command was a little bit off, but my body felt really good. I made some good pitches at times.”

Hanson is expected to open the season as the Braves’ No. 2 starter.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.