Ron Roenicke is a thoughtful guy

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This is not really a deep post or anything — and it’s likely not all that interesting to Brewers fans who are familiar with the guy already — but I thought it was worth noting that Ron Roenicke makes a great impression, seems very thoughtful and bright and seems like a dude I’d like to have manage my team.

He spoke to assembled media in his office for about 20 minutes. Since there isn’t any real news happening now, the questions were somewhat random and lent themselves to Roenicke making some jokes and talking about his philosophy on a number of things as opposed to facts and moves and things.

The funny: there are split squad games tomorrow and today’s game against the Indians, of course.  He wasn’t sure which teams they were playing when and where. He turned to the team PR guy to his left to ask what was what. The PR guy wasn’t sure either. Roenicke: “Sometimes I don’t know who we’re playing the next day, to be honest. I just know if we’re home or away.”

The thoughtful: first he was asked about how much more he knows about the team now as opposed to his managerial debut. He said that he doesn’t feel like he is a master of anything, really, and that “every day I feel like something happens where I learn something. From both positive and negative experiences.”  Very zen. Not at all surprising that he comes from the same managerial tree as Joe Maddon.

He continued in that vein when asked about Johnny Narron’s approach to hitting. He was asked how Narron differs from former hitting coach Dale Sveum. He said that Narron is unique in that he’s all about positive reinforcement. According to Roenicke, that’s not a common approach for hitting coaches. Which he finds strange because “hitting is so negative,” he said. “Guys go up to the plate sometimes and, no matter what, they think they’ve already got no chance.”  He said it’s a natural thing and that everyone does it, especially when they’re struggling, and that Narron tries to counteract that.

Is that all touchy-feely? Maybe. I dunno. I’m in a fantastically good mood today, though, and it just seemed right. And refreshing to hear, especially in the soft-spoken and affable manner Roenicke has.  It made me jealous that my team doesn’t have him as its manager. It would probably make most fans feel that way.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?