We have different definitions of the term “fresh start”

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Player A here is back with the same team he was with a year ago. In fact, it’s the same team he’s been with his entire career. He’s not playing for a new manager. He’s not learning a new position. He’s healthier than he was a year ago at this time, but given that he finished last season healthy, that’s hardly news.

Worse, Player A has played exactly two positions in the majors the last two years. Over the winter, his team acquired new starters at both of those positions.

So, tell me, how exactly is Kyle Blanks “getting a fresh start” with the Padres? Because he has new hitting coaches? Really?

The article even concludes with the fact that Blanks will likely open the season in Triple-A as a result of the team’s additions of Yonder Alonso at first base and Carlos Quentin for left field. Blanks also has some experience in right, but given that the Padres are already planning on carrying Jesus Guzman, Mark Kotsay and Chris Denorfia as backup outfield options, there’s no room for him on the bench.

If this constitutes a fresh start, I’d pass. What Blanks needs, considering that his long-term future is almost certainly at first base or DH, is an actual new start away from San Diego. The 25-year-old has power to spare and still might prove to be a long-term regular, but it’s not likely to happen with the Padres.

Mickey Callaway will not be fired over his blowup at a reporter

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As you no doubt saw already, Mets manager Mickey Callaway had a bad day yesterday. After some testy exchanges with the media over his bullpen use, he blew up at Newsday reporter Tim Healey after Healey told Callaway that he’d see him tomorrow, which Callaway took as sarcastic. Then Jason Vargas unhelpfully piled on, walking toward Healey and threatening him with violence. Healy spoke to his Newsday colleague David Lennon and explained the whole thing here. He’s pretty even-handed about it.

Callaway was already thought to be on at least moderately thin ice as Mets manager given his team’s underachievement this year. Thin ice or not, it’s not unreasonable to say that his behavior yesterday is something that a lot of teams would think of as a fireable offense. At the very least leaders in other businesses would think that way if one of their public-facing employees treated a reporter who covered him in that manner. In addition to it simply being bad form, it raises questions about Callaway’s temperament and his ability to handle pressure and adversity.

The Mets, however, do not seem to consider the matter to raise to that level. While they offered apologies to Healey and vowed that that he will be welcome in the clubhouse — for which Healey was appreciative — Callaway will be back to work as usual today, with the Mets announcing this morning that he will hold his usual pre-game press conference at 4PM in advance of tonight’s game against the Phillies.

Tell me: if you’re the GM or owner of a team and your manager does that, do you keep him? What do you do?