Colby Rasmus trying to keep his father out of his game

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The influence exerted by father and former coach Tony Rasmus always got a big part of the blame when the relationship between Colby Rasmus and the Cardinals went south. Colby, for his part, doesn’t want to see the same thing happen in Toronto.

“I’m trying not to talk to him a whole lot,” Rasmus said recently. “I just tell him I need more positive influence because I got enough negative influence over in St. Louis in the early going. I think all that negative energy kept me down while I was there. I really never let it go.”
Rick Hummel has a nice, lengthy writeup on Rasmus, his struggles with the Cardinals and his fresh start with the Blue Jays over at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. There’s a lot of good stuff in it, though he concluded it with a completely unnecessary cheap shot:
Like his Cardinals predecessor of 12 to 15 years ago, J.D. Drew, Rasmus seems to have little desire to be a great player.
Maybe I wouldn’t mind it so much if he subbed in “star” for “great player” there, because there’s definitely a difference in cases like this.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.