Three-time All-Star Carlos Guillen announces retirement

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Carlos Guillen, who signed a minor-league contract with the Mariners on February 1, announced his retirement today.

Guillen had a remarkable career, transitioning from light-hitting shortstop to an impact bat who played all over the diamond, but injuries limited him to just 81, 68, and 28 mostly ineffective games during the past three seasons.

He calls it quits at age 36 after playing 14 seasons in the majors, including two huge years for the Tigers in 2004 (.318 with 20 homers and a .921 OPS) and 2006 (.320 with 19 homers and a .920 OPS).

Overall the switch-hitting Guillen batted .285 with a .355 on-base percentage and .443 slugging percentage in 1,305 games for the Mariners and Tigers. Among all active hitters with at least 5,000 career plate appearances he ranks 32nd in adjusted OPS+ at 111, alongside Alfonso Soriano (112), Andruw Jones (111), and Adrian Beltre (110).

He made three All-Star teams and earned $70 million. Not a bad career for a guy who was second-best prospect (behind Freddy Garcia) traded from the Astros to the Mariners for Randy Johnson in 1998.

UPDATE: Guillen talked about his decision with Greg Johns of MLB.com:

It’s a tough decision. I tried to come back, but I couldn’t. I’ve been through a lot of injuries. You have to keep your head up and be in the right position to keep going. But at this time, your body tells you, you know? It’s hard because you only make this decision one time in your career and in your life.

Nationals’ major leaguers to continue offering financial assistance to minor leaguers

Sean Doolittle
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
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On Sunday, we learned that while the Nationals would continue to pay their minor leaguers throughout the month of June, their weekly stipend would be lowered by 25 percent, from $400 to $300. In an incredible act of solidarity, Nationals reliever Sean Doolittle and his teammates put out a statement, saying they would be covering the missing $100 from the stipends.

After receiving some criticism, the Nationals reversed course, agreeing to pay their minor leaguers their full $400 weekly stipend.

Doolittle and co. have not withdrawn their generosity. On Wednesday, Doolittle released another statement, saying that he and his major league teammates would continue to offer financial assistance to Nationals minor leaguers through the non-profit organization More Than Baseball.

The full statement:

Washington Nationals players were excited to learn that our minor leaguers will continue receiving their full stipends. We are grateful that efforts have been made to restore their pay during these challenging times.

We remain committed to supporting them. Nationals players are partnering with More Than Baseball to contribute funds that will offer further assistance and financial support to any minor leaguers who were in the Nationals organization as of March 1.

We’ll continue to stand with them as we look forward to resuming our 2020 MLB season.

Kudos to Doolittle and the other Nationals continuing to offer a helping hand in a trying time. The players shouldn’t have to subsidize their employers’ labor expenses, but that is the world we live in today.