Conflicting reports on the Athletics-San Jose thing

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It has been three years since Major League Baseball set up a committee to look into whether the A’s can move to San Jose. So you’d figure there would be some resolution on the matter now.  Guess what? Nope!

Two conflicting reports over the weekend. First from Bill Madden of the New York Daily News:

Unfortunately, the “Moneyball” film came up empty with the Academy Award voters, and the same fate beckons for Beane and Oakland A’s owners Lew Wolff and John Fisher in their determined effort to move to a new stadium in Hi-Tech haven. The latter prospect, in which, for a variety of reasons, MLB is going to uphold the San Francisco Giants’ territorial rights in San Jose …

Then comes Hank Schulman’s report in the San Francisco Chronicle:

I’ve just been told by someone in the commissioner’s office that contrary to what a New York newspaper suggested yesterday, the A’s proposed move to San Jose is not on life support. And, it is not true that Commissioner Bud Selig and baseball owners have all but decided to uphold the Giants’ territorial rights to San Jose, which would preclude the A’s from going there.

Who knows? Madden’s report was casual to the point of catatonic, passing along that little nugget in the course of yet another lame “Moneyball” analogy. If it was news — Extra! MLB to slam the A’s! — you’d think it would warrant its own story or at least its own sentence. This smells like scuttlebutt that couldn’t be confirmed and is now being passed along as gossipy conventional wisdom.

That said, the reasoning in Madden’s story — Selig doesn’t have the support of the other owners to approve the San Jose move — makes a lot of sense, so it’s possible that that’s where things will eventually go.

But the key takeaway here is this: IT HAS TAKEN THREE YEARS TO DECIDE THIS.

Padres release Phil Hughes

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The Padres have released right-hander Phil Hughes. He was recently designated for assignment.

Hughes was traded from the Twins to the Padres at the end of May in a deal that was, essentially, the Padres acquiring a Competitive Balance pick and agreeing to pick up half of Hughes outstanding salary, which is $13.2 million in 2019. The Padres used him for 16 relief appearances but he was terrible, posting a 6.10 ERA.

The 32-year-old is a 12-year veteran. Given that he’ll basically be free to anyone who wants him, it’s not unreasonable to think he’ll get a non-roster invite to someone’s spring training next year, but it could very well be the end for him as well.