Padres and Cameron Maybin agree to five-year extension with club option for 2017

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UPDATE: Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com passes along word that the deal is official. Crasnick also notes that Maybin’s desire for a no-trade clause was denied because the Padres have a club policy against giving no-trade clauses.

12:05 PM: Corey Brock of MLB.com confirms that the deal is worth $25 million. Sounds like a potential bargain for the Padres.

11:51 AM: Dan Hayes of the North County Times reports that the deal is worth $23-25 million while the club option is in the range of $7-8 million.

11:23 AM: The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that the Padres will announce the extension later today.

The new deal will lock up Maybin through 2016 and includes a club option for 2017. In other words, the Padres have bought out all three of his arbitration seasons and at least his first year of free agency.

10:59 AM: Dan Hayes of the North County Times was told by a front office source that the Padres and Cameron Maybin are “very close” to finalizing a extension and that a deal could be announced today. No word yet on the possible terms.

The two sides had off-and-on discussions about a possible deal earlier this offseason, but talks progressed after Maybin switched agents in January.

Maybin, who was acquired from the Marlins last offseason for relievers Ryan Webb and Edward Mujica, batted .264/.323/.393 with nine homers, 40 RBI, 40 stolen bases and a .716 OPS over 137 games in 2011 while playing solid defense in center field. The 24-year-old owns a .255/.318/.386 batting line over his first 1,178 plate appearances in the majors.

Maybin is set to become arbitration-eligible for the first time next winter and remains under team control through 2015.

Baseball seeking a second lab for MLB COVID-19 tests

MLB COVID-19 tests
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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reported last night that Major League Baseball is “actively pursuing an additional medical lab site to increase the speed and efficiency” of MLB COVID-19 tests.

The current setup — as planned by MLB and approved by the MLBPA as a part of the plan to play the 2020 season — is for all MLB COVID-19 tests to be sent to and processed by MLB’s PED testing lab in Salt Lake City, Utah. As you likely heard, there have been delays in the administration of COVID-19 tests and in the shipping of tests to Utah, but to date no one has reported that the lab itself has not been able to handle the tests once they’ve arrived there. If MLB is looking for a second lab site a week into this process, it suggests that their plans for the Utah lab might not be working the way they had anticipated.

The issues with testing have created unease around the game in recent days, with some players and team executives speaking out against Major League Baseball’s handling of the plan in the early going. Commissioner Rob Manfred, meanwhile, has responded defensively to the criticism.

Meanwhile, the New York Times reported this morning that, months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the United States still lacks testing capacity. From the report:

Lines for coronavirus tests have stretched around city blocks and tests ran out altogether in at least one site on Monday, new evidence that the country is still struggling to create a sufficient testing system months into its battle with Covid-19 . . .“It’s terrifying, and clearly an evidence of a failure of the system,” said Dr. Morgan Katz, an infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins Hospital . . . in recent weeks, as cases have surged in many states, the demand for testing has soared, surpassing capacity and creating a new testing crisis.

It’s less than obvious, to say the least, how Major League Baseball plans to expand capacity for MLB COVID-19 tests while America as a whole is experiencing “a new testing crisis” and a “failure of the system.” At the very least it’s less than obvious how, even if Major League Baseball can do so, it can do so ethically.