Bryan Petersen emulates Logan Morrison in all of the wrong ways

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The Marlins have a second outfielder whose tweets they may need to worry about.

Bryan Petersen, a 25-year-old outfielder with a shot of making the team as a bench player this spring, tweeted the following this evening:

For those of u who think u have to hit .330 with 30 and 100 to have a life off the field, suck it. It’s not my fault u hate ur 9 to 5.

The sentiment isn’t so wrong. The delivery, though, could definitely use some work.

Oh, and just in case Petersen’s tweet wasn’t going to get enough attention with his 8,000+ followers, the game’s most notorious tweeting player, Marlins teammate Logan Morrison, retweeted it to his 93,000+ followers.

Petersen, for what it’s worth, was pretty impressive with his .265/.357/.387 line in 204 at-bats last season, though that came with all of 10 RBI (he hit .300 with the bases empty, .203 with runners on). He has a chance to be a pretty good part-timer going forward, but as far more of a fringe player than Morrison, he’s not going to get as much leeway for any missteps.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.