The players are not happy with the Braun decision

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At least the ones Buster Olney has spoken to.  He reports that he has spoken with dozens and dozens of ballplayers off the record in the past week, and that as many as 80-90% of them are upset at the Braun decision.  They don’t like that he challenged procedure as opposed to substance, and they think it’s bad for the testing program overall, which they sincerely want to work.

I understand that. And I think it’s a good thing for drug testing in baseball overall that there are people who are upset at it.  Like I said yesterday, systems are improved over time when blips and inefficiencies occur.  The Braun decision may seem unjust on some level, but its lasting legacy will not be about what it means for Braun, it will be about how, when faced with a problem in the system, the league and the union can work together to address it. Which I am certain they will here, either by clarifying the collection procedures to their people in the field or by changing the Joint Drug Agreement to conform to the practices those in the field have employed and to apply them going forward.

All of that said, complaints that the Braun decision somehow puts testing at risk is silly.  Braun walking on this charge is no more of a threat to the drug testing system than a guy getting off on a burglary charge because the cops didn’t get a proper search warrant is a threat to the criminal justice system. You may hate the result, but the remedy is easy: get it right next time or change the rules to make what happened in that instance acceptable.  It is not something that puts the entire regime in peril.

Finally, I’ll observe that these complaints all seem a little self-righteous to me.  No one who ever wins on a procedural argument themselves ever seems to have a problem with it.  And I suspect that the 80-90% of the players Olney spoke with here were under the gun themselves, they would not hesitate to make the same arguments Braun did if they or their legal advisors thought to do so.

And That Happened: Wednesday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Braves 3, Reds 1: I was at this game with 12,948 of my closest friends, many of whom were disguised as empty seats. We had a good time, though. Ozzie Albies‘ leadoff homer allowed me to launch into a jag about how bad his contract extension is, Yasiel Puig‘s fifth inning two-base error that allowed what proved to be the winning run allowed me to launch into a jag about the pros and cons of Puig as a player and the Braves victory allowed me to talk about my mixed feelings as a Braves fan given the front office’s miserly and cynical approach to the club. Which means that I drove a couple hundred miles, got home late last night and I’m sleep-deprived this morning to, you know, be at work. Oh well, at least baseball is pretty.

Cubs 7, Dodgers 6: The Dodgers had a 3-0 lead when the Cubs scored six runs in the sixth inning via two three-run homers, both of which came with two outs. Walker Buehler gave up one to Javier Báez and Scott Alexander gave up the other to Jason Heyward. Talk about not being able to buy a friggin’ out. The Cubs won for the seventh time in eight games. Oh, and this is fun: Pedro Strop got the save for the Cubs. On a night when his car was stolen before the game, he had to talk to the cops about it during the game before he pitched and in which it was reportedly involved in a police chase while he pitched.

Cardinals 5, Brewers 2: Macrell Ozuna hit a three-run homer and Yadi Molina added a solo shot in the Cards’ four-run fourth inning. Adam Wainwright allowed one run in six innings for his 150th career victory. After the game he said, “It means something to me. I’m proud to have been a Cardinal for the whole time of it, too.” Which seemed off to me because my mind still has him having made his debut with the Braves but, nah, he didn’t. He was just a prospect I was wishcasting on and for whom I was merely imagining major league glories at the time Atlanta traded him to St. Louis. But hey, I still have all of those sweet J.D. Drew memories. The Brewers have dropped seven of eight.

Rockies 9, Nationals 5: Raimel Tapia had two doubles and drove in three runs and Germán Márquez allowed three runs over seven, striking out seven. Daniel Murphy returned after 20 games lost to the injured list and then almost went back on it after nearly getting run over by a giant racing tooth, toothbrush and tube of toothpaste. I wish I was making that up.

Royals 10, Rays 2: Blake Snell‘s return from the injured list did not go according to plan: three runs — two earned — on five hits and he couldn’t even get the second out in the fourth inning. Adalberto Mondesí hit a three-run homer and drove in four runs for Kansas City and Billy Hamilton had two hits and two RBI. The Royals snapped their five-game losing streak.

Speaking of “snapped,” I’m taking the kids to Avengers: Endgame tonight. Forgive me if I’m distracted today. I promise I won’t spoil anything tomorrow. But that’s just because I’m taking tomorrow off. If I was working I’d totally spoil stuff because I can’t help myself.

Indians 6, Marlins 2: José Ramirez hit a solo homer in the first, had an RBI single in the third, and hit a two-run double in the eighth, so I guess he’s pulling out of that slow start. Jefry Rodríguez got the start for Cleveland and allowed only one run on three hits through seven. He didn’t get the win, though, as this was a close one, with the Tribe blowing a 2-1 lead thanks to a Martín Prado homer in the eighth before putting up a four-spot in the bottom half of the inning.

Athletics 6, Rangers 5: Chad Pinder hit a two-out RBI bloop single in the ninth to give the A’s the walkoff win. Earlier he made a diving catch to rob Shin-Soo Choo of a hit leading off the fifth inning when the game was tied at three. Matt Chapman and Marcus Semien homered as the A’s completed a three-game sweep. Nomar Mazara hit two homers for Texas.

Padres 1, Mariners 0: Chris Paddack outdueled Félix Hernández, tossing seven one-hit shutout innings and striking out nine. Ian Kinsler‘s second inning homer was the only run scored in the game, which lasted a crisp two hours and five minutes. It’s appropriate, then, that Hernández passed Don Drysdale on the all-time strikeout list during this one, as the game may as well have taken place in 1968 or something.

Giants 4, Blue Jays 0: Drew Pomeranz tossed six shutout innings and two relievers finished the job, holding the Jays to only two hits on the afternoon. That’s OK, though. Jays fans have their mind on something else now.

Phillies 6, Mets 0:  On Tuesday, Mets reliever Jacob Rhame buzzed Rhys Hoskins‘ tower in a way neither Hoskins nor the Phillies appreciated. Last night Hoskins got his revenge, facing Rhame in the ninth inning, he drove a 1-1 fastball over the left field fence for a two-run home run. He then broke out a slower-than-molasses home run trot:

It was the slowest trip around the bases in baseball since 2015, according to the folks who keep track of such things. Hoskins also walked and tripled.

Diamondbacks 11, Pirates 2: Ketel Marte homered twice, once as a lefty, once as a righty, as the Dbacks romped. They’ve been romping for three straight days, actually, outscoring the Pirates 25-7 in the first three games of this four-game series. It’s getaway day today, so I imagine the Pirates are hoping Arizona just mails it in.

Orioles 4, White Sox 3: Stevie Wilkerson of the Orioles came to bat in the fourth, a ball came close to him, he acted like it hit him, the up directed him to first base and he began walking down the line. The White sox challenged the call, it was overturned, Wilkerson came back to bat and promptly hit a solo homer to give the O’s what turned out to be the winning run. That’ll show ’em.

Red Sox 11, Tigers 4: J.D. Martinez hit two singles, a double and drove in a run, Christian Vázquez had two RBI singles and Eduardo Rodríguez allowed only one run over six as the Sox got an easy win. Haven’t been many of those so far this year.

Astros 7, Twins 1: Justin Verlander gave the Astros the strong start they’ve been needing of late, going eight innings, allowing only one run on four hits while striking out eight. Josh Reddick and Michael Brantley each drove in a pair as those two and Carlos Correa all homered.

Yankees 6, Angels 5: The Angels led 5-0 heading into the sixth inning, didn’t score another run and watched a Yankees comeback capped by D.J. LeMahieu singling in the go-ahead run in the top of the ninth. Andrelton Simmons hit two homers but the Angels lost for the ninth time in ten games.