Ryan Madson sticking with agent Scott Boras despite disappointing contract

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Scott Boras was able to land Prince Fielder a massive contract, but two of his other clients, Ryan Madson and Edwin Jackson, ended up settling for one-year deals well below what they were expecting when the offseason began.

Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com writes that “there’s a lot of buzz in baseball circles that Madson might be on the verge of shopping for a new agent in the aftermath of a bad negotiating experience this offseason.”

Madson, however, said today that he’s sticking with Boras:

I’m still with Scott and I plan on being with Scott for the foreseeable future. Everything is the same. That’s the way the business part of the game works. You can hear one story from one person and that’s the truth, then a different story from somebody else and that could be true. It’s a group of people making decisions, and you’re not going to pin it down unless you get the whole group together.

Boras claimed that the Phillies did Madson wrong by pulling what he believed was a four-year, $44 million offer made early in the offseason, but general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. insists it never reached the acceptance stage. Philadelphia then signed Jonathan Papelbon for $50 million and Madson settled for a one-year, $8.5 million deal from the Reds.

It’s probably misleading to say that cost him $35 million, because if healthy Madson will be able to land another sizable deal next offseason, but no one could blame him for being disappointed with how things went. And if Boras is going to be lavished with praise for the Fielder signing, the flipside should be true when it comes to Madson and Jackson.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.