Mike Minor: start me in the majors or trade me

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Braves starter Mike Minor is likely to be the Braves’ fifth starter. But yesterday he made it clear that, if there’s any doubt about that, he’d just as soon be traded:

“Overall, it’s not really – it’s about making the team, but if … I can control my third pitch and have a decent fourth pitch, then there’s no reason I shouldn’t pitch in the big leagues somewhere. If they don’t have room for me here, then there’s no reason they shouldn’t trade me or just do something with me.”

He sort of backed off that later, saying that the Braves should trade him if he hasn’t earned his spot in the rotation.  Which is sort of the same, but definitely different in tone.  His original comments make it seem like he thinks he’s already earned it and deserves to start before Julio Teheran and Randall Delgado.  And he’s probably right about that.

Thing is, it’s all probably moot.  With the 1-2-3 in that rotation being Tim Hudson, Jair Jurrjens and Tommy Hanson — all three either injury risks, injury bouncebacks and/or trade candidates — Minor, Teheran and Delgado will all likely have a place in that rotation alongside Brandon Beachy and one of the remaining 1-2-3 this time next year. If not sooner.

Behold: The new Marlins logo

Marlins
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The Marlins have not released their new uniform design — at least not yet — but they did release their new logo today. That’s it up top. It’s not too bad? Here’s the secondary logo, which you could maybe imagine on a cap?

The logo appears at the end of the video below which is, until the final few seconds, not about baseball at all. It’s about Miami. A “this is our town” promotional thing which takes you on a tour and shows you people and the culture of the city.

A lot of times when sports teams do this stuff it seems somewhat contrived, but I think it’s pretty cool here. The Marlins have almost never sent much of a “we are a part of our community” message. Jeff Loria lived in New York for Pete’s sake and, of course, they infamously consider themselves a foreign corporation for legal purposes. Before this, the most they ever seemed to want out of Miami is tax subsidies and to be left the hell alone.

You can’t just market your way into a community — and the Marlins have a long way to go before they can earn back any sort of trust from baseball fans in Miami —  but the fact that they are at least trying to make themselves part of the Miami community is probably worth something.

Anyway: