Drug testing procedures expert dismisses the importance of drug testing procedures

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Best thing about PED stories? If you wait around long enough, you’re going to get a quote from Dick Pound. And who doesn’t love Dick Pound?

Anyway, Pound used to be the head of the World Anti-Doping Agency. WADA styles itself as the foremost experts on drug testing and procedure. If you run a league they’ll even run your testing program for you, because WADA is well aware of just how important and delicate the whole process is.  Amateurs need not apply! Leave the complicated procedures to the professionals!

Except, when it involves an athlete not getting suspended for a drug test as opposed to getting busted, those procedures don’t much matter:

“He’s won on a very thin legal technicality that has no substantive value at all,” said Dick Pound, the former head of the World Anti-Doping Agency.

“He’s running around saying that he’s cleared is a misstatement. Anybody who’s at all neutral in this is going to say, ‘Well, he dodged a bullet with that.’ ”

“There was no sign of any tampering, so I don’t understand how a properly formed independent panel could come to the conclusion that that invalidated the test,” Pound said. “It’s not sitting there in the fridge generating false testosterone.”

Well, it wasn’t in a fridge. It was on some dude’s desk in a Tupperware container, but thanks for playing.

And for the rest of you: (1) ask yourself what the point of having procedures is if they don’t make any difference; and (2) the next time you hear Dick Pound or his fellow travelers talking about how important proper testing procedures are, well, feel free to ignore them. If you’re not already.

Jim Crane thought the heat over sign-stealing would blow over by spring training

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The Astros’ sign-stealing story broke in November, a steady drumbeat of coverage of it lasted through December and into January, when Rob Manfred’s report came out about it. The report was damning and, in its wake, Houston’s manager and general manger were both suspended and then fired.

After that a steady stream of media reports came out which not only made the whole affair seem even worse than Manfred’s report suggested, but which also suggested that, on some level, Major League Baseball had bungled it all and it was even worse than it had first seemed.

Rather than Manfred and the Astros putting this all behind them, the story grew. As it grew, both the Red Sox and Mets fired their managers and, in a few isolated media appearances, Astros’ players seemed ill-prepared for questions on it all. Once spring training began the Astros made even worse public appearances and, for the past week and change, each day has given us a new player or three angrily speaking out about how mad they are at the Astros and how poorly they’ve handled all of this.

Why have they handled it so poorly? As always, look to poor leadership:

Guess not.

In other news, Crane was — and I am not making this up — recently named the Houston Sports Executive of the Year. An award he has totally, totally earned, right?