Drug testing procedures expert dismisses the importance of drug testing procedures

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Best thing about PED stories? If you wait around long enough, you’re going to get a quote from Dick Pound. And who doesn’t love Dick Pound?

Anyway, Pound used to be the head of the World Anti-Doping Agency. WADA styles itself as the foremost experts on drug testing and procedure. If you run a league they’ll even run your testing program for you, because WADA is well aware of just how important and delicate the whole process is.  Amateurs need not apply! Leave the complicated procedures to the professionals!

Except, when it involves an athlete not getting suspended for a drug test as opposed to getting busted, those procedures don’t much matter:

“He’s won on a very thin legal technicality that has no substantive value at all,” said Dick Pound, the former head of the World Anti-Doping Agency.

“He’s running around saying that he’s cleared is a misstatement. Anybody who’s at all neutral in this is going to say, ‘Well, he dodged a bullet with that.’ ”

“There was no sign of any tampering, so I don’t understand how a properly formed independent panel could come to the conclusion that that invalidated the test,” Pound said. “It’s not sitting there in the fridge generating false testosterone.”

Well, it wasn’t in a fridge. It was on some dude’s desk in a Tupperware container, but thanks for playing.

And for the rest of you: (1) ask yourself what the point of having procedures is if they don’t make any difference; and (2) the next time you hear Dick Pound or his fellow travelers talking about how important proper testing procedures are, well, feel free to ignore them. If you’re not already.

Rays’ Díaz gets $24 million, three-year deal, avoids arbitration

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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Tampa Bay Rays infielder Yandy Díaz agreed to a $24 million, three-year contract on Tuesday that avoided a salary arbitration hearing.

Díaz’s agreement could be worth $36 million over four seasons.

The 31-year old will receive $6 million this season, $8 million in 2024 and $10 million for 2025. The 2026 club is $12 million with no buyout. There is a $1 million assignment bonus that would be payable by receiving team.

Díaz has spent parts of six seasons in the majors with Cleveland (2017-18) and Tampa Bay (2019-22). He has a career average of .278 with 39 home runs and 198 RBIs.

Acquired by the Rays in a three-team trade on Dec. 13, 2018, Díaz hit .296 with nine homers and 57 RBIs in 137 games last season, He career highs with 71 runs, 140 hits, 33 doubles, and 78 walks.

Díaz was the third Rays’ arbitration-eligible player to reach a deal.

Reliever Pete Fairbanks agreed Friday to a $12 million, three-year contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons. The 29-year-old right-hander was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Left-hander Jeffrey Springs also agreed last week to a $31 million, four-year contract that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

The 30-year-old began last season in the bullpen and transitioned to the starting rotation in May and finished 9-5 with a 2.46 ERA in 33 appearances, including 25 starts.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, and outfielder Harold Ramírez.