The Burnett trade should have been voided? What?

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The Yankees traded A.J. Burnett to the Pirates. They’re paying $20 million of his contract. The Pirates are getting a pitcher who, despite his problems, could be pretty good in the NL Central and definitely improves their staff. They’re only paying $6.5 million a year for him and didn’t have to give up much talent at all to get him.

This is a win-win deal, right?  And even if it’s not totally win-win, it’s not like anyone is taking advantage of anyone, right?

Well, that’s not what Richard Griffin of the Toronto Star says. He thinks the trade is an atrocity of some kind that should have be voided by Bud Selig in the best interests of baseball.  Allow him to explain:

It’s great for the Pirates because they are not a real contender and now have a short-term starting ace who won’t get attached and be looking for something awkward — like, say, an extension. It’s great for the Yankees because now they can add in other areas and win it all again.

Wait. That makes it sound like a fine deal, Mr. Griffin. Try again. Why is this so awful?

With A.J. coming off an 18-win, 231 strikeout season, the Yanks outbid all comers. They offered an outrageous five years and $88.5 million for a guy who was barely .500 and has always required the presence of better pitchers on his own staff to be most effective.

The commissioner’s office should consider how that bad Burnett contract impacted other similar free agents in the winter of 2008-09 and the next off-season and how it had a negative trickle down effect that hurt small market teams like Pittsburgh.

I dunno, I’m lost. You go read it. The best I can gather is that Griffin didn’t like the original contract the Yankees handed out to Burnett so … the trade three years later should be voided? Am I missing something here?

This is a perfectly acceptable baseball move. Each team is trying to get better, the Pirates by moderate addition, the Yankees by subtraction.  In what possible way does this deal make anyone uncomfortable?

Colin Poche, Rays go to arbitration just $125,000 apart

Colin Poche torn UCL
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Reliever Colin Poche went to salary arbitration with the Tampa Bay Rays on Tuesday with the sides just $125,000 apart.

The gap between the $1.3 million the pitcher asked for and the $1,175,000 the team offered was the smallest among the 33 players who exchanged proposed arbitration figures last month. The case was heard by John Woods, Jeanne Vonhof and Walt De Treux, who will hold their decision until later this month.

A 29-year-old left-hander, Poche had Tommy John surgery on July 29, 2020, and returned to the major leagues last April 22 after six appearances at Triple-A Durham. Poche was 4-2 with a 3.99 ERA and seven saves in 65 relief appearances for the Rays. He struck out 64 and walked 22 in 58 2/3 innings.

Poche had a $707,800 salary last year.

Tampa Bay went to arbitration on Monday with reliever Ryan Thompson, whose decision also is being held until later this month. He asked for $1.2 million and the Rays argued for $1 million.

Rays right-hander Jason Adam and outfielder Harold Ramirez remain scheduled for hearings.

Players and teams have split four decisions thus far. All-Star pitcher Max Fried ($13.5 million) lost to Atlanta and reliever Diego Castillo ($2.95 million) was defeated by Seattle, while pitcher Jesus Luzardo ($2.45 million) and AL batting champion Luis Arraez ($6.1 million) both beat the Marlins.

A decision also is pending for Los Angeles Angels outfielder Hunter Renfroe.

Eighteen additional players are eligible for arbitration and hearings are scheduled through Feb. 17. Among the eligible players is Seattle utilityman Dylan Moore, who has a pending three-year contract worth $8,875,000.