Phillies, Kyle Kendrick wipe out previous one-year deal with two-year, $7.5 million contract

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Kyle Kendrick and the Phillies avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $3.585 million deal last month, but today the two sides signed a new two-year, $7.5 million contract that cancels out the previous deal.

Or, put another way, they tacked on an extra year and another $3.915 million to the previous agreement.

Either way, the Phillies clearly valued the cost certainty that comes with pre-paying for Kendrick’s arbitration years and once the two-year contract ends they’ll still have him under team control in 2014 via his final year of arbitration.

Kendrick’s career strikeout rate of 4.1 per nine innings is the fourth-worst of any active pitcher with at least 500 innings, but he threw 115 innings with a 3.22 ERA last season split between the rotation and bullpen. He’s currently slated to be the Phillies’ long reliever unless the team finds a taker for Joe Blanton’s contract (and doesn’t replace Blanton with a new veteran starter).

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.