Giants camp to be all Buster Posey, all the time

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I don’t believe we ever officially welcomed Andrew Baggarly to the fold over here. Already my favorite Giants beat writer, he just made the move from the San Jose Mercury News to CSN Bay Area, where he’ll continue covering the team.

Baggarly today provides a full rundown on the current plans for Buster Posey, who is coming back from last year’s gruesome ankle injury. He’s all ready to play and he’ll catch a couple of pitchers during the first official workouts in Giants camp on Sunday, but he’ll also have a light workload initially in camp and he might spend some time at first base in an effort to keep him strong.

If you want more details than that, go read the full article. Or just do it anyway. We’re all one big happy family here under the Comcast umbrella.

Except, of course, I have to pick on Baggarly now, because he closes his article with this:

Everyone knows it: Posey’s recovery is the most significant storyline for the Giants this spring and it’s integral to their chances to reestablish themselves in the NL West. It’s no surprise that a large number of national media members have requested time with him after Sunday’s workout. The Giants arranged a news conference setting to deal with the requests.

Maybe it won’t be on par with the annual “State of Barry” news events. But Posey is every bit as important to the Giants as Barry Bonds used to be.

No. No way. Not even close. Probably no one since Babe Ruth has ever been as important to his team as Barry Bonds used to be. Forget for a moment about how he got to be the player he was and just amaze at the numbers: Bonds posted an OPS over 1.000 in 13 straight seasons, topping out at 1.422. He won seven NL MVP awards, including four in a row from 2001-04. Those four seasons rank fourth, second, eighth and first all-time on the single-season OPS list.

I’m a big Buster Posey fan, but the odds are against him winning even one NL MVP award. His health is a huge key to the Giants’ chances this season. But the Giants did manage to go 86-76 without him last year. When Bonds missed most of 2005, the Giants slipped from 91 wins to 75.

Major League Baseball told Kolten Wong to ditch Hawaii tribute sleeve

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Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Major League Baseball has told Cardinals infielder Kolten Wong that he has to get rid of the colorful arm sleeve he’s been wearing, pictured above, that pays tribute to his native Hawaii and seeks to raise awareness of recovery efforts from the destruction caused by the erupting Mount Kilauea.

Goold:

[Wong] has been notified by Major League Baseball that he will face a fine if he continues to wear an unapproved sleeve that features Hawaiian emblem. Wong said he will stash the sleeve, like Jose Martinez had to do with his Venezuelan-flag sleeve, and find other ways to call attention to his home island.

Willson Contreras was likewise told to ditch his Venezuela sleeve.

None of these guys are being singled out, it seems. Rather, this is all part of a wider sweep Major League Baseball is making with respect to the uniformity of uniforms. As Goold notes at the end of his piece, however, MLB has no problem whatsoever with players wearing a non-uniform article of underclothing as long as it’s from an MLB corporate sponsor. Such as this sleeve worn by Marcell Ozuna, supplied by Nike that, last I checked, was not in keeping with the traditional St. Louis Cardinals livery:

ST. LOUIS, MO – MAY 22: Marcell Ozuna #23 of the St. Louis Cardinals celebrates after recording his third hit of the game against the Kansas City Royals in the fifth inning at Busch Stadium on May 22, 2018 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)

If Nike was trying to get people to buy Hawaii or Venezuela compression sleeves I’m sure there would be no issue here. They’re not, however, and it seems like creating awareness and support for people suffering from natural, political and humanitarian disasters does not impress the powers that be nearly as much.