Wanna buy a house from a ballplayer?

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In honor of the beginning of spring training, Realtor.com has assembled a page of listings of homes of several former and current ballplayers.  The players: Adrian Beltre, Pat Burrell, Matt Cain, Barry Larkin, Derek Lowe, Jack McDowell, Jamie Moyer, John Smoltz — whose home we’ve featured previously — and Jonathan Papelbon.  There are links to several more pictures of each house at the bottom of the page.

Takeaways:

  • Moyer’s is a tudor-style mansion. It is not, as is commonly believed, an actual tudor-era home, built under his personal supervision in the year 1587, though it could be. Because Jamie Moyer is old. Get it? He’s old! Hahaha! Ah, ahem. Sorry.
  • Pat Burrell’s house in Scottsdale is exactly as I would have expected for a guy with his swingin’ single reputation. I believe he purchased it from Austin Powers.
  • I was disappointed to read on Jonathan Papelbon’s Wikipedia page that he has two children, because I was hoping that the kid-friendly design of his home was all for him. Like he was Ricky Schroeder in “Silver Spoons” or something.

Overall: ballplayers in general have a lot of damn money and spend it on pretty fabulous real estate and because I have something of a real estate fetish I wish I was rich like baseball players are sometimes. There, I said it.

Video: Ramon Torres hits little league home run in first at-bat of season

Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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The Royals recalled infielder Ramon Torres from Triple-A Omaha on Saturday. He didn’t get into a game until starting Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, batting ninth.

In the top of the second inning, facing Austin Bibens-Dirkx, Torres laced a single up the middle. Center fielder Delino DeShields charged in on it, attempting to keep Ryan Goins at second base, but the ball went right past his glove, through his legs, and nearly trickled all the way to the warning track. Goins scored easily and Torres was waved home, too. He managed to narrowly beat the throw, touching home plate with his left hand on a head-first slide.

The play was officially scored a single and a three-base error. Torres wasn’t credited with an RBI on the play. But at least the Royals got two runs out of it.