Gary Carter loses his battle with cancer

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It was inevitable. But it doesn’t make it any less sad. Gary Carter, the Hall of Fame catcher who put the Montreal Expos on the map and helped the New York Mets win a World Series died today at the age of 57.

Carter had been battling brain cancer for the past nine months. While there were some ups and downs during his battle, his prognosis had turned grave of late.  He made his last public appearance two weeks ago at a Palm Beach Atlantic University baseball game, greeting the players he would have coached this season if not for the state of his health.

But for as tragic as the past year has been for Carter and his fans, he will always be remembered as one of the greatest catchers who ever lived. He posted a career line of .262/.335/.439 while hitting 324 homers and driving in 1225 runs. He was a three-time Gold Glove winner, but that probably underrates his defense, as being in the same league as Johnny Bench — who was probably the best ever — made many forget that Carter was fantastic himself.

He had his best years with the Expos, making the All-Star team as a right fielder/catcher at the age of 21 in 1975 and later leading them through their most productive era as a franchise. He then went on to New York and similarly led the Mets through theirs, culminating in a 1986 World championship. In 1992, after brief stops in San Francisco and Los Angeles, he returned to the Expos for one final season.

Good travels, Kid.  Wherever they may take you.

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See also: Carter by the numbers

Bryce Harper will participate in the Home Run Derby if he makes the All-Star team

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Bryce Harper has, in recent years, declined participation in the Home Run Derby, with his last go at it coming in 2013, losing to Yoenis Cespedes in the final round. With the All-Star Game taking place at Nationals Park in Washington, however, he has changed his mind, saying today that he will compete if he is selected for the All-Star team.

Harper is currently second in voting among National League outfielders, so he stands a pretty good chance of making it. Even if he falls off in the voting, you have to assume that the powers that be will nudge NL manager A.J. Hinch to select Harper as a reserve, partially because of his actual power — he does have 19 homers so far this year — but mostly for his star power.

Simply put, you know dang well that both Major League Baseball and the Nationals want a home town guy with big time star power in the Derby, even if he’s not having as good a year as he’s capable of. As such, figure to see Harper hitting long balls in D.C. on July 16.