Are the Orioles for sale?

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Peter Angelos is probably going to live forever — such is the way of trial lawyers, bad baseball owners and the very, very rich — so really, the only hope that Orioles fans have for that franchise to turn around one day is if Angelos decides to sell.

And there are rumors that he’s doing just that:

The big rumor swirling around Baltimore is that Peter Angelos is quietly shopping the Orioles. Eric Bickel of 106.7 The Fan in D.C. disclosed the news Tuesday morning on The Sports Junkies.

“It’s my understanding that the Baltimore Orioles are quietly for sale,” Bickel told listeners.  ”Peter Angelos is actively selling the team at least privately to some people around him.”

But don’t get too excited. The rumor also holds that Angelos wants to retain his interest in MASN and the TV rights to the Orioles, selling just the team.

Which makes zero sense as TV rights are a tremendous source of income for an owner. Who would want that kind of a deal? It’d be like buying a movie theater but not taking over the concession stand. Like buying a video store and not taking over the adult section.*  There’s just no economic coherence to it.

But at least this rumor gives Orioles fans a chance to at least pretend that Angelos may be gone soon. And that’s not nothing.

*Do video stores still exist? I sort of think they don’t. Anyone?

The Cubs are considering a sportsbook at Wrigley Field

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With the nationwide ban on sports gambling gone — and with sports gambling regulations slowly being implemented on a state-by-state basis — any number of businesses are considering getting in on the action. Among those businesses are the Chicago Cubs.

ESPN reports that the club is considering opening gambling facilities in and around Wrigley Field which might include betting windows, automated kiosks or, possibly, a full, casino-style sportsbook. They’re characterized as preliminary discussions as the team awaits the Illinois governor’s signature on recently-passed legislation allowing gambling. The Cubs aren’t commenting, but a source tells ESPN that nothing has been done yet. It’s just talk at the moment.

If the Cubs move forward from the talking stage it will cost them a pretty penny: a four-year license will, under Illinois’ new law, cost them $10 million.

Now: let’s see the White Sox take some action this year. I can think of nothing more fun than sports gambling at what was once Comiskey Park on the 100th anniversary of the Black Sox scandal.