Carl Barger’s family isn’t happy with No. 5 being unretired for Logan Morrison

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We learned over the weekend that the Marlins were unretiring No. 5 so that Logan Morrison could wear it in memory of his father. Nice story, right? Turns out it’s a bit more complicated.

According to Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post, the family of former Marlins’ president Carl Barger didn’t hear from the team before the announcement was made.

The Marlins retired No. 5 before the franchise’s first game in honor of Barger, who died while attending the winter meetings in December of 1992. No. 5 was chosen because Joe DiMaggio was Barger’s favorite player.

“It’s disappointing. He gave his life to the Marlins,’ said Betzi Barger, who’s father Carl Barger was the Marlins’ team president from July 8, 1991 until his death on Dec. 9, 1992.

“Nobody (from the Marlins) has contacted us,’ Betzi Barger said when contacted Monday by The Palm Beach Post. “It’s just a disappointment but there’s nothing we can do. We’re sorry we didn’t find out about it except from you.’

Marlins president David Samson said it was his understanding that the Bargers had signed off on the plan, so this wasn’t a matter of Morrison enthusiastically jumping the gun. The Marlins still plan to honor Barger with a plaque at the ballpark and want his family to attend the unveiling, but Barger’s daughter isn’t sure if they’ll go. And unless there’s a pretty good explanation for the misunderstanding, it’s hard to blame them.

Nationals sign George Kontos to minors deal

George Kontos
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The Nationals selected the contract of reliever George Kontos from the Atlantic League Long Island Ducks, per an official announcement on Saturday. The right-hander has been assigned to Triple-A Fresno, but could still make his season debut sometime before the first half of the season draws to a close.

Kontos, 33, hasn’t pitched in the majors since he took a handful of back-to-back-to-back gigs with the Pirates, Indians, and Yankees in 2018. He inked a minor league pact with the Cubs over the offseason, but failed to break camp with the team and was subsequently released in mid-April. He turned in seven strong innings for the Ducks since then, allowing one run and one walk and striking out six of 27 batters in six appearances.

Last year, the veteran reliever posted a combined 4.39 ERA, 2.4 BB/9, and 5.1 SO/9 over 26 2/3 innings. While he hasn’t pitched anywhere close to his career-best numbers in four years, he may still provide some valuable depth for the club, whose bullpen ranks 10th best in the league with a cumulative 4.59 ERA and 5.9 fWAR so far in 2019.