Why won’t anyone take the Pirates’ money?

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Last week we learned that both Edwin Jackson and Roy Oswalt turned down offers from Pittsburgh, and in Jackson’s case he turned down the Pirates’ three-year, $30 million offer to sign a one-year, $11 million deal with the Nationals.

Dejan Kovacevic of the Pittsburgh Tribune Review notes that the Pirates also tried to keep Derrek Lee back by tendering him a contract in December via the arbitration process, which would have locked him into a one-year deal worth at least $7 million. Lee turned it down and is still trying to find a home as a free agent.

So why won’t anyone take the Pirates’ money? General manager Neal Huntington tried to explain:

Honestly, we just need to keep playing better ball. When we win, we’re going to see those results change, along with a lot of other things. We have a great pitcher-friendly ballpark. We have a lot of pieces in place. But the winning has to happen first. And it will. We still feel very good about the team we’ll have in 2012.

He’s right, of course, although to some extent it’s a chicken-or-egg situation because not being able to sign veteran free agents they target is, in theory at least, holding the Pirates back from doing more winning. As it stands now, Pittsburgh hasn’t finished .500 since 1992 and last season’s 72-90 record was the Pirates’ best since 2004.

Nationals’ major leaguers to continue offering financial assistance to minor leaguers

Sean Doolittle
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
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On Sunday, we learned that while the Nationals would continue to pay their minor leaguers throughout the month of June, their weekly stipend would be lowered by 25 percent, from $400 to $300. In an incredible act of solidarity, Nationals reliever Sean Doolittle and his teammates put out a statement, saying they would be covering the missing $100 from the stipends.

After receiving some criticism, the Nationals reversed course, agreeing to pay their minor leaguers their full $400 weekly stipend.

Doolittle and co. have not withdrawn their generosity. On Wednesday, Doolittle released another statement, saying that he and his major league teammates would continue to offer financial assistance to Nationals minor leaguers through the non-profit organization More Than Baseball.

The full statement:

Washington Nationals players were excited to learn that our minor leaguers will continue receiving their full stipends. We are grateful that efforts have been made to restore their pay during these challenging times.

We remain committed to supporting them. Nationals players are partnering with More Than Baseball to contribute funds that will offer further assistance and financial support to any minor leaguers who were in the Nationals organization as of March 1.

We’ll continue to stand with them as we look forward to resuming our 2020 MLB season.

Kudos to Doolittle and the other Nationals continuing to offer a helping hand in a trying time. The players shouldn’t have to subsidize their employers’ labor expenses, but that is the world we live in today.