The Red Sox: small market team?

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The Red Sox obviously haven’t had an active offseason. They got a new manager, picked up a couple of relievers and signed Cody Ross. Not exactly the stuff that an Alpha Team on the Alpha Division is expected to do, I suppose.  Jon Heyman questions this approach and wonders what it all means for the Red Sox:

Bobby Valentine was thrilled to get the job as Red Sox manager. But did he know he might be going to spring training without a starting shortstop and only three set-in-stone starting pitchers? Young, bright Ben Cherington had to be excited to ascend to the Red Sox GM job. But did anyone tell him he’d have to operate like a small-market club? … Boston’s total outlay of cash was less than $10 million (not counting Valentine). Henry hasn’t explained the sudden frugality. But here’s one guess: He overpsent on soccer.

Taking the last part first, I can’t say I know anything about John Henry’s soccer team, but I bet that it’s a net money maker for the Fenway Sports Group, not a drain on the Red Sox.

As for the baseball points, I guess I have to ask what Boston was supposed to have spent so much money on.  They already have a payroll of close to $200 million and will be paying the luxury tax.  They made two gigantic signings just last year in Adrian Gonzalez and Carl Crawford. Their needs this year — shortstop and starting pitching depth — did not match up with any huge-salary free agent out there this year. At least one that made sense for the team.

However bad the last month of the season was, they still won 89 games. Whatever flaws the team has right now, there is no obvious solution to them that simply involves spending more money.  While it’s totally fair game to inquire about the direction of the Boston Red Sox or any other team, I’d like to know what Heyman would have done with John Henry’s money that Ben Cherington hasn’t done.

Nationals’ Strasburg ejected for arguing from the stands

Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports
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NEW YORK — A pitcher getting ejected for arguing balls and strikes – on his day off? And, from the stands?

Nationals star Stephen Strasburg earned one of baseball’s most unique ejections – probably ever – in the third inning of Washington’s game against the New York Mets on Thursday.

Strasburg was sitting in Section 121 at Citi Field in this socially distant season because he’s scheduled to start Friday against Baltimore Orioles. He was apparently unhappy with the strike zone of plate umpire Carlos Torres after Austin Voth‘s 2-2 pitch to Pete Alonso on the outside corner was ruled a ball.

Moments later, Torres ejected last year’s World Series MVP, though it took a few seconds to realize who had been tossed.

Someone was heard yelling: “You’re (expletive) brutal” shortly before television cameras captured Strasburg doffing his cap as he walked up the staircase on his way out of the park.

“Sorry, folks – sorry, FCC,” Mets broadcaster Gary Cohen said on SNY.

The usually stoic Strasburg appeared to be grinning underneath his blue mask as he made his exit.