Write a book critical of the Mets, lose media credentials

20 Comments

Note: if you write stuff the Mets don’t like, they’re probably not gonna give you media credentials. Just ask Howard Megdal of the LoHud Mets blog:

Since taking over the LoHud Mets Blog in March 2011, I have been credentialed numerous times by the New York Mets-100 percent of the time my editor here, Sean Mayer, has requested credentials. So it was odd that last week, Sean received a call from Jay Horwitz, the Director of Media Relations for the New York Mets, telling him that while the Journal News can continue to receive credentials, the Mets would not be credentialing me.

Sean asked why that was, and Jay responded that the Mets “don’t like my reporting”. The team declined to respond to my multiple attempts to reach them for a fuller explanation.

Of course, Howard just published a book about the Wilpons, Madoff, David Einhorn and such, so I presume that’s the reporting they “don’t like.”  Earlier this winter the Mets accused Megdal of being a liar and a self-promoter, but his account in the book has held up as far as can be determined. Megdal and his publisher stand by it and much of it has been corroborated by other reporters.

My view:  if a reporter abuses his access by either breaking rules of the ballpark or acting unethically, sure, cast him out.  But keeping him out simply because you don’t like what he has to say?  Please.

Of course, ultimately, the Mets can do whatever they want with their media credentials. It’s their business and their ballpark and they have complete power to keep people out if they want to. They just have to realize, however, that when they do this kind of thing they look like petulant and thin-skinned children.

Nationals promote 19-year-old prospect Juan Soto

SportsLogos.net
1 Comment

The Nationals recalled 19-year-old outfield prospect Juan Soto from Double-A Harrisburg on Sunday, per a team announcement. Soto is poised to become the youngest player in the league once he makes his official debut with the club, and the Nationals’ first teenager to enter the majors since Bryce Harper made his first appearance back in 2012.

Entering the 2018 season, Soto was ranked no. 2 in the Nationals’ system and 15th overall. He’s certainly lived up to the hype during his first two years of pro ball, blazing through Single-A, High-A and Double-A levels in 2018 alone. While he logged just eight games at the Double-A level prior to his promotion to the majors, he proved consistent across all three levels this spring and slashed a cumulative .362/.462/.757 with 14 home runs and a 1.218 OPS in 182 plate appearances.

It’s not entirely clear how soon or in what capacity the Nationals will utilize their youngest player, but Soto’s tear through the minors is sure to pave the road for a few opportunities on the big-league level. He’ll be available off the bench for Sunday’s series finale against the Dodgers.