The Rays have “said almost nothing” about their stadium situation? Really?

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Here’s MLB.com’s Richard Justice in an article about the Tampa Bay Rays, just published a few minutes ago:

It’s impossible not to admire how the Tampa Bay Rays are handling their stadium situation. They’ve said almost nothing publicly, taking the high road and letting the politicians do the talking.

Yes, the Rays have said almost nothing about their stadium situation and how it puts them at a financial disadvantage. The have said almost nothing. Except, you know, for when they have.

Here was Rays’ owner Stuart Sternberg in mid-October:

“… eventually Major League Baseball is going to vaporize this team. It could go on nine, 10, 12 more years, but between now and then it’s going to vaporize this team. Maybe a check gets written locally, maybe someone writes me a check (to buy the team). If I had $80 million to put out there, we’d be moving along in life.”

Here was Sternberg a week before that:

“I am frustrated this year. We’ve replicated last year [on the field] and our attendance numbers were down 15 percent and our ratings were down. The rubber has got to meet the road at some point here … Whatever you want to say, there are 29 other teams passing us like we’re going in reverse right now. Except on the field. And at some point that changes.”

Here was Sternberg last June, talking about how the fans won’t come to his park:

“Water is a big divide …  You know, we’ve learned really lots about what — I would say — (are) the driving habits of people. And their … ability to sort of navigate bridges.”

Then there was that time in June 2010 Sternberg said that the ballpark was “not viable,” and said that the team should be courted by the bay area as if they were a team from out of town looking to move in:

“If we weren’t here, how would people treat us?” Sternberg said wistfully. “I think that’s how I’d like to see this community react. If we weren’t here, I think it would take a regional effort to get us here.”

Then there was that time that Evan Longoria complained about how no one wants to go to their ballpark.

Hey, I’d complain too! It kind of stinks being the Rays, having a great team and having to play in a crap ballpark that no one wants to go to.

But let’s not pretend that they’ve said “almost nothing” about it, always taking the high road and never getting involved in the politics of it all.  They’ve been agitating about it for years.

Yasmani Grandal played himself out of NLCS Game 4

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Dodgers catcher Yasmani Grandal has not had a good postseason. Entering Monday night’s NLCS Game 3, he was batting .111/.238/.278 in 21 trips to the plate across the NLDS and the first two games of the NLCS.

Defense has also been an issue for Grandal. In Game 1 of the NLCS, Grandal was on the hook for two passed balls. In the sixth inning of Game 3 Monday night, he couldn’t corral a curve in the dirt, which allowed Travis Shaw to score the Brewers’ second run of the night. Starter Walker Buehler was charged with a wild pitch. In the eighth, with Ryan Braun on first base and Shaw at the plate, Grandal again couldn’t corral a pitch in the dirt, allowing Braun to move to second base. Fortunately for the Dodgers, Alex Wood was able to escape the inning with no damage.

Manager Dave Roberts said that Austin Barnes, not Grandal, will start behind the plate for Game 4 on Tuesday night, Andy McCullough of the Los Angeles Times reports. That comes as no surprise at all. When Grandal struck out with the bases loaded in the ninth inning, Dodger fans regaled him with boos.

Barnes will be an upgrade defensively, but he’s lacking with the bat. He had an 0-for-3 performance in Game 2, though with an RBI, bringing his career slash line in the playoffs to .200/.281/.300 across 57 plate appearances. During the regular season, his career 100 adjusted OPS is a fair bit behind Grandal’s 115. Roberts is trading offense for defense in Game 4. Rich Hill will get the start opposite the Brewers’ Gio González.