Fausto Carmona and Leo Nunez might be pardoned for falsifying their identities

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Good news for the men formerly known as Fausto Carmona and Leo Nunez, as Dominican Today reports that “the U.S. State Department could pardon the Dominican baseball players caught with a false identity.”

That apparently comes from some remarks consul general William Weissman made during an event yesterday, although he declined to address any specific cases and also noted that players turning themselves in should result in much different treatment.

Carmona (now Roberto Hernandez Heredia) and Nunez (now Juan Carlos Oviedo) did not turn themselves in and are currently having difficulty securing visas, putting their status for spring training and perhaps even Opening Day in question.

Dominican Today reports that the country’s sports minister, Felipe Payano, asked United States officials to pardon the players, saying: “For those baseball players who are in difficult situations, we ask that you consider what they represent for the Dominican Republic and their families.”

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.