Quote of the Day: Old Hoss Radbourn

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Hall of Fame pitcher Old Hoss Radbourn died in 1897.  Those of you who follow the baseball rebop on Twitter, however, know that his ghost haunts social media. And despite the fact that he died 76 years before I was born, he has more than three times as many Twitter followers than me. Vexing.

Anyway, Hoss gave an interview to Jon Weisman of the newly-independent Dodger Thoughts, and it runs today.  It’s all worth a read, especially if you’re a Dodgers fan, but my favorite bit is about fandom. It serves as a wonderful rejoinder to the comments of some of the Philly fans in that post about booing this morning:

2) The Dodgers play in Los Angeles. What kind of appeal does this city hold for an oldtimer like yourself?

None, I am afraid. Base ball is meant to be played in nasty, inclement weather with angry, miserable louts for fans who take the sport too seriously and seek nothing more than to horse-whip you for making the slightest of mistakes. I believe this insane misanthropy has in recent years been mis-labeled as “passion.”

Hoss has already paid the ultimate price. He has no reason to lie.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.