Chicago ad agencies angry at the Cubs for hiring a New York firm

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I’m guessing a baseball team hiring service providers like lawyers, accountants and ad agencies from other cities is pretty common, but I’m drawn to this story anyway. Why? Because I was years behind watching “Mad Men,” and in the last month or so I have been catching up, often by watching two episodes or sometimes even three in one evening.

The things we do when we have tons of free time.

Anyway, I’m up to the beginning of season 4, so I’m gonna be all finished and ready when the new season starts in March.  And I’m totally ready to tear into this little bit of Chicago Cubs business gossip:

In the eyes of a lot of local ad executives, the Chicago Cubs have just struck out.  Big time.

The team lost a big chunk of potential fans from Chicago’s advertising industry in recent days when the Cubs rather quietly announced it had retained a New York-based ad agency, quaintly-named The Brooklyn Brothers, to orchestrate its newest ad campaign with the theme line “Baseball Is Better.”

Cut to Don Draper’s office. Don, having just heard some bad news about his wife/mistress/person from his weird past/Roger/Someone, sits back in his chair with an impatient, annoyed look on his face as the creative team pitches him ideas.

Paul Kinsey:  It’s simple. A picture of a player hitting a baseball and the slogan “Baseball is Better.”

Don Draper [pauses, takes a drag from his Lucky Strike]: “Baseball is Better?”  Better than what? You’re asking me to compare Chicago Cubs baseball to all sorts of things to do in Chicago. I hate to say it, but those other things are going to sound better to me now that I think about them.”

Paul [looks down, sullen, defeated]

Peggy Olson [quickly, hopeful]:  Not better than, better when. “Better when the ball hits Waveland Avenune.”  “Better when it’s played in front of ivy-covered walls.”

Don [takes a gulp of Canadian Club]: Too desperate. Baseball is better. It’s always better and always will be. By merely introducing these thoughts we’re suggesting that it’s an argument baseball has to make rather than have it be assumed. Get back at it. Try harder. I can’t do all of this myself.

Don leaves to have a meaningless tryst with a woman far more interesting than his wife Betty.

The Yankees and Red Sox will both be wearing home whites for the London Series

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This summer’s series between the Yankees and Red Sox in London is, technically, a home series for the Red Sox, with the Yankees serving as the visitors. Pete Abraham reports that Major League Baseball is dispensing with the usual sartorial formalities, however, and will have both teams wearing their home livery: the Red Sox will wear white and the Yankees will wear pinstripes.

It’s marketing more than anything, as you can’t really put your league’s marquee franchise on an international stage and not have it wearing its iconic duds, right?

It’s also pretty harmless if you ask me. Baseball is not like football or basketball in which you have to have contrasting uniforms in order to keep one side from accidentally throwing the ball to the opposition or what have you. And with so many teams wearing solid color alternates now — sometimes both the home and road team are in blue or red jerseys in the same game — it’s not like there hasn’t already been a breakdown in home white/road gray orthodoxy. I prefer the classics, but I lost that battle a long time ago.

So: I say let a thousand colors fly. Heck, let the Yankees wear their pinstripes on the road all the time. Who’ll stop ’em?