We’re expecting a lot from Yu

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Yeah, I went with the cute headline. Sue me.

In signing Yu Darvish to a six-year, $60 million contract, the Rangers committed $111.7 million to the 25-year-old hurler. Whether he’ll stay healthy and justify the expense is anyone’s guess, but given his track record, it was a price worth paying.

My guess is that Darvish becomes far and away the Rangers’ best hurler and the American League Rookie of the Year this season. A Cy Young Award seems unlikely, but it can’t be completely ruled out. My projection for the upcoming Rotoworld draft guide calls for a 15-8 record, a 3.49 ERA and 186 strikeouts in 193 2/3 innings.

Darvish’s first big test will be the adjustment from pitching once a week to once every five or six days. The second will be the Texas heat in the summer. Put him in the NL in a bigger ballpark and I would have projected him for a sub-3.00 ERA this year. Rangers Ballpark, though, is the most hitter friendly in the AL.

I see Darvish getting off to a terrific start, but fading as the year goes on and maybe logging some time on the disabled list with arm fatigue. Darvish was a workhorse in Japan — he completed 10 of his 28 starts and threw 232 innings last season — but this new schedule will take some getting used to. It actually might be for the best if he misses a chunk of July or August; the Rangers should have the depth to cover for him and he’d likely be stronger down the stretch and, hopefully, in the postseason.

Dodgers to retire Fernando Valenzuela’s No. 34 this summer

Robert Hanashiro-USA TODAY Sports
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LOS ANGELES – The Los Angeles Dodgers will retire the No. 34 jersey of pitcher Fernando Valenzuela during a three-day celebration this summer.

Valenzuela was part of two World Series champion teams, winning the 1981 Rookie of the Year and Cy Young awards. He was a six-time All-Star during his 11 seasons in Los Angeles from 1980-90.

He will be honored from Aug. 11-13 when the Dodgers host Colorado.

Valenzuela will join Pee Wee Reese, Tommy Lasorda, Duke Snider, Gil Hodges, Jim Gilliam, Don Sutton, Walter Alston, Sandy Koufax, Roy Campanella, Jackie Robinson and Don Drysdale with retired numbers.

“To be a part of the group that includes so many legends is a great honor,” Valenzuela said. “But also for the fans, the support they’ve given me as a player and working for the Dodgers, this is also for them.”