The Cubs are making scouts take the subway!

33 Comments

Well, they don’t call it the subway in Chicago. It’s the L. But that’s not important right now. What’s important is that the Cubs’ owners are being compared to Marge Schott by Gordon Wittenmyer of the Chicago Sun-Times:

For instance, a big-market team that just committed $3.5 million a year to a newly created position of president of baseball operations, that created several other high-level front-office jobs and that’s assured of trimming tens of millions of dollars from its big-league payroll this season is pulling a Marge Schott on its scouting staff this week to save relative pennies.

Borrowing a page from the notoriously cheap former Cincinnati Reds owner, the Cubs assigned their scouts two-to-a-room hotel accommodations this week and advised using the L instead of cabs, including to and from airports with their luggage, sources said.

“Sources” likely being “a scout really, really mad that he can’t expense cab fare anymore.”

Look, I love some good us-against-the-suits rabble-rousing, and I guess this does stink for the lower-level employees. But forgive me if this doesn’t exactly rise to the level of outrage for me.  Wake me up when cost-cutting actually prevents the team from making smart baseball decisions.

Video: Justin Verlander reaches career mark with 270th strikeout

Justin Verlander
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Justin Verlander is approaching the tail end of a fantastic year with the Astros — arguably one of his best in the last decade — and on Saturday, he kicked off his last regular season start at Minute Maid Park with a strikeout, his 270th of the year. While that’s still a few shy of Max Scherzer‘s league-best mark of 290, it was a new personal record for Verlander, who had yet to beat the previous career record he set with 269 strikeouts in 2009.

Verlander’s moment arrived at the top of the first inning on a seven-pitch called strikeout against the Angels’ Kole Calhoun. Cole worked a 2-2 count, then fouled off a pair of 95-MPH fastballs before missing the seventh and final pitch at the top of the strike zone.

Jose Fernandez battled twice as long in the next at-bat, albeit with far more disastrous results. His 14-pitch duel against the Astros’ righty ended when he caught a fastball on his hand and was forced to come out of the game.

After expending a total of 27 pitches in the first inning, however, Verlander returned in the second to strike out the side, then logged another pair of strikeouts in the third. With six strikeouts through three innings, he boosted his season strikeout total to 275 — just a hair above fellow Houston righty Gerrit Cole (and all other AL pitchers), who previously led the team with 272 whiffs on the year.