A great interview with Robert Creamer

14 Comments

Graham Womack of Baseball Past and Present conducted an email interview with venerable baseball writer and author Robert Creamer.

Creamer, who began following baseball as a kid in 1931 and began covering it for Sports Illustrated in 1954, provided a zillion fascinating answers all around, including his takes on steroids (you bet your bippy Babe Ruth would have taken them), the best player he ever covered (which leads to an extended discussion of Willie Mays) and the Baseball Writers Association of America (“it simply does not mean much anymore”).

I found his most interesting answer to be about baseball’s status as national pastime.  Whenever someone talks about that, they refer to fandom. At least I do. But Creamer explains it differently:

 It’s our spectator sport and I think possibly still our biggest spectator sport, and we love to read about it and talk about it and watch it on TV but nobody PLAYS baseball anymore. Softball, yes,but today everybody plays basketball or touch football whereas a century ago EVERYBODY played baseball. If you can find an old newspaper file from around 1912, ten years before I was born, look at the coverage of games on Saturdays and particularly Sundays – dozens of games, club teams, neighborhood teams, small town teams, political clubs, social clubs. It’s astonishing.

Can you imagine if that was the case? Club teams and work teams and everything else? Not playing beer league softball, but genuine baseball.  Now we have some random over-30 leagues but that’s not exactly extensive.

Anyway, cool interview. Creamer sounds neat. He’s living evidence that one does not need to close one’s mind and become cranky as one gets older.

Braves shutting down Mike Soroka for 4-5 days due to shoulder problems

Getty Images
1 Comment

Mark Bowman of MLB.com reports that Braves starter Mike Soroka will be shut down for the next 4-5 days due to renewed soreness in his right shoulder.

Soroka is not presently listed in the top five of the Braves depth chart at starter, but is nonetheless an enormously talented pitcher who, at some point this season, was likely to figure into their plans. He was supposed to figure in more largely than he did last season, but after an impressive debut he missed the entire second half with shoulder problems, making only five starts.

There will no doubt be a reevaluation of him in the next few days, but this is could bad news for the Braves’ pitching depth.