The Orioles are interested in Francisco Cordero

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When the Reds signed Ryan Madson to a one-year, $8.5 million deal with a club option last week, it left Francisco Cordero without a logical landing spot to close ballgames in 2012. However, Dan Connolly of the Baltimore Sun is hearing that the Orioles have expressed interest in the veteran right-hander.

Cordero, who turns 37 in May, posted a 2.45 ERA and 37 saves last season in Cincinnati, but also averaged just 5.4 K/9 and saw his fastball velocity dip to a career-low 93 mph. While he induced ground balls 50 percent of the time and had his lowest walk rate since 2007, the American League East isn’t exactly the best environment for his decline phase.

Recent reports have suggested that Jim Johnson is the front-runner to close games for the Orioles this season, but the possible addition of Cordero could perhaps put him back in the mix for a rotation spot. Former closer Kevin Gregg is still under contract for $5.8 million this season, but Connolly hears that the O’s would be willing to eat some of his salary in a potential trade. Gregg is coming off a season where he posted a 4.37 ERA and an ugly 53/40 K/BB ratio over 59 2/3 innings, so it’s difficult to envision many teams lining up for his services, even at a discounted rate.

Yoenis Cespedes may need season-ending surgery

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Yoenis Cespedes is facing potential season-ending surgery, the outfielder told reporters following the Mets’ 7-5 win over the Yankees on Friday. Newly-returned from the disabled list after rehabbing a hip flexor strain and quad tightness, Cespedes appeared to be back to his old self after going 2-for-4 with a walk, base hit, and home run (his ninth of the year) during Friday’s series opener, but later remarked that he was suffering from calcification in both of his heels.

The only remedy, it appears, is a surgery that would require anywhere from 8-10 months of recovery. Should he elect to undergo the procedure now, it goes without saying that he won’t be able to return to the field before end of the regular season. On the other hand, if he postpones the surgery until the offseason, he could miss the first half of the Mets’ run in 2019.

The pain doesn’t seem to be debilitating, at least for the time being, but Cespedes added that any discomfort in his heels causes him to stand, walk, and run differently, which presents a definite problem if the club intends to ramp up his workload going forward. The Mets have yet to announce a final decision regarding any surgical procedure, though they will bench the outfielder for Saturday’s matinee against the Yankees. Following yesterday’s impressive performance, Cespedes is currently batting .262/.325/.496 on the year with 15 extra-base hits, three stolen bases, and an .821 OPS through 157 PA.