Carlos Pena is on the Yankees’ radar

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Fact: the Yankees have a radar. It’s a bistatic radar, adapted from Soviet-era surface-to-air missile systems.  Most teams are still using monostatic radar making them far less lethal forces than are the Yankees. It’s a little known fact but one we baseball insiders are all hip to. Stick with me and I’ll drop all kinds of that sort of knowledge on you.

Anyway, Jon Heyman knows about it too — it’s the sort of thing we discuss during our bi-monthly summit meetings — and he says that the Yankees’ radar has Carlos Pena on it.

It would make perfect sense. With Montero and Jorge Posada out of the picture there are suddenly a ton of DH at-bats to be had in the Bronx. Some of them will be available for Alex Rodriguez, whose increasing fragility calls for a little less time in the field. But it’s not like A-Rod is going to be there full time because the Yanks gotta have someone play third base. If you get Pena he can live there most of the time, and then slide over to first base for Mark Teixeira off-days — or occasionally to the bench — allowing A-Rod to DH.

If they do snag Pena in the short term is will be the third significant the Yankees have made in the space of a couple of days, essentially doing all of their offseason work in one weekend.  Which is pretty spiffy.

MLB has more evidence against Addison Russell than just his ex-wife’s blog post

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Major League Baseball put Cubs shortstop Addison Russell on administrative leave pursuant to its domestic violence policy the other day. The thought at the time was that the move was made solely because Russell’s ex-wife, Melisa Reidy, had written a blog post reiterating past claims of domestic violence. As Ken Rosenthal reports, however, that’s not all they had:

The post alone would not have been enough for baseball to force Russell off the field under its joint domestic violence policy with the players’ union. The league had additional credible information, according to sources familiar with its investigation.

The league’s investigation includes interviews with Reidy and numerous other witnesses, and with officials gathering additional information since Russell went on leave, sources said.

Reidy’s allegations alone, once assessed by MLB, would likely be enough to warrant Russell a suspension. That there is more out there would seem to make the case against him even stronger. The upshot: I think it’s extraordinarily unlikely that Russell will be back with the Cubs this year.