Dmitri Young no longer eats like a viking

23 Comments

We’ve seen a couple of stories about Dmitri Young’s dramatic weight loss and desire to come back and play in the majors again.  Jerry Crasnick’s is the most in-depth so far, however, and it’s hard not to want to root for Young after reading it.

Plus it has fun stuff like this:

“I’m not eating like a Viking now,” Young said. “I’ve learned to hold off, and when I do get my treat, I don’t abuse it. I’ll eat one slice of pecan pie and call it a day, instead of eating half the pie or the whole pie.”

I’d be shocked, given how many DH-types are available on the market right now, if Young actually got a job.  But I’d love to see him get an invite and play some spring training games.  I loved him as a player and everyone I know who has had some contact with him says he’s great.

Sandy Koufax to be honored with statue at Dodger Stadium

Tim Bradbury/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax will be honored with a statue at Dodger Stadium, expected to be unveiled in 2020. Dodger Stadium will be undergoing major renovations, expected to cost around $100 million, after the season. Koufax’s statue will go in a new entertainment plaza beyond center field. The current statue of Jackie Robinson will be moved into the same area.

Koufax, 83, had a relatively brief career, pitching parts of 12 seasons in the majors, but they were incredible. He was a seven-time All-Star who won the National League Cy Young Award three times (1963, ’65-66) and the NL Most Valuable Player Award once (’63). He contributed greatly to the ’63 and ’65 championship teams and authored four no-hitters, including a perfect game in ’65.

Koufax was also influential in other ways. As Shaikin notes, Koufax refused to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series to observe Yom Kippur. It was an act that would attract national attention and turn Koufax into an American Jewish icon.

Ahead of the 1966 season, Koufax and Don Drysdale banded together to negotiate against the Dodgers, who were trying to pit the pitchers against each other. They sat out spring training, deciding to use their newfound free time to sign  on to the movie Warning Shot. Several weeks later, the Dodgers relented, agreeing to pay Koufax $125,000 and Drysdale $110,000, which was then a lot of money for a baseball player. It would be just a few years later that Curt Flood would challenge the reserve clause. Koufax, Drysdale, and Flood helped the MLB Players Association, founded in 1966, gain traction under the leadership of Marvin Miller.