Billionaire who once proposed tearing down Dodger Stadium now bidding on the Dodgers

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Just about every day a new bidder on the Dodgers is revealed.  Most of them are billionaires you’ve never heard of.  Then some familiar names surface:

… with its legal hostilities against the Dodgers ceased, Fox would like to buy back part of the team … Fox does not want to run the Dodgers again but the company wants to secure the team’s long-term television rights, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Fox has reached out to prospective bidders to indicate its interest in acquiring a minority share of the club — essentially offering to pay part of the Dodgers’ purchase price so as to lock up the TV rights, the person said.

That’s just a matter of math. If it’s going to cost several billion to secure TV rights for the Dodgers — which it will — why not pay way less than that to get a minority stake in the team and thus, presumably, far more favorable pricing on the TV side?

Also identified as a bidder in that article: billionaire Alan Casden.  Hopefully his thoughts about the Dodgers and the place they play have changed since the last time he was reported to be interested in buying the team:

In 2003, Casden proposed buying the Dodgers, moving them to a new downtown ballpark and tearing down Dodger Stadium to build housing on the site. “They knock down stadiums all the time,” Casden told The Times then. “Dodger Stadium is not an antique. It’s not Frank Lloyd Wright. It’s a nice place to play baseball, but there are far better.”

Yeah, let’s just give him a pass, OK?

 

Fried, Braves go to salary arbitration for 2nd straight year

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Brett Davis/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Pitcher Max Fried went to salary arbitration with the Atlanta Braves for the second straight year, asking for $15 million instead of the team’s $13.5 million offer.

The 29-year-old left-hander went 14-7 for the second straight season and lowered his ERA to 2.48 from 3.04 in 2021. Fried was a first-time All-Star last season, was second to Miami’s Sandy Alcantara in Cy Young Award voting and was third in the National League in ERA behind Alcantara and Julio Urias with the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Fried won a $6.85 million salary last year instead of the team’s $6.6 million proposal in arbitration. That was after he pitched six shutout innings in World Series Game 6 as the Braves won their first title since 1995.

Fried, who is eligible for free agency after the 2024 World Series, had his case heard Friday by a panel that’s expected to issue a decision Saturday.

Players have won two of three decisions so far: Pitcher Jesus Luzardo ($2.45 million) and AL batting champion Luis Arraez ($6.1 million) both beat the Miami Marlins. But Seattle defeated Diego Castillo ($2.95 million).

A decision is being held for Los Angeles Angels outfielder Hunter Renfroe, whose case was argued Monday. About 20 more cases are scheduled through Feb. 17.