Joe Posnanski does Joe Posnanski things with the Hall of Fame results

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It’s kind of hard to summarize a Joe Posnanski blog post because they tend to be about 6 things, cover about 4,000 words and do way better on their own than any summary can really handle.  But there is a new Joe Posnanski post up about the Hall of Fame and, as always, it’s chock full of interesting stuff.

Best part: Joe puts together a lineup of the best players who have ever (a) appeared on the Hall of Fame ballot; but (b) never got a single vote.  And it’s a good team!  Joe notes ” I’ll bet that team, at its best, could beat the worst Hall of Fame team you could put together in a best of seven series.”

I think he may be right, even though he does have Bob Horner starting at third base which would be all kinds of ugly.  And I think his ability to come up with topics like that — the stuff of awesome barroom debate — every other day is one of the reasons he just won The National Sportswriter of the Year Award.

Great stuff. Especially the bit about the no-vote-getting Hall of Fame lineup.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.