Mets hire the turnaround consulting firm that handled the Rangers bankruptcy and sale

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Eno Sarris of Amazin’ Avenue reported last night that the New York Mets have hired a consulting firm called CRG Partners.  The significance?  That’s the same consulting firm Tom Hicks and the Texas Rangers hired in 2010 (a) to put them into and help them through bankruptcy and; (b) to eventually help sell the team to Chuck Greenberg and Nolan Ryan.

A little after Eno’s report came out the Mets confirmed that they hired CRG. But they disputed any suggestion that this has anything to do with a bankruptcy or a sale. Rather, it was “to provide services in connection with financial reporting and budgeting processes.”

Could be. There are a lot of reasons to hire a turnaround firm and if the Wilpons don’t plan to sell they can’t be forced to unless everything completely crashes. But as Eno points out in his report, such firms make the biggest money when they help orchestrate something big, not when they come in and help a business optimize their TPS reports.

It strikes me that the thing to watch here is when and if the Mets finally manage to sell off those minority interests they’ve been trying to sell in order to raise cash.  Sandy Alderson said yesterday that he believes that’s going well and deals could close this month, but it’s been taking a while and nothing has been announced.

Know who else tried to sell minority shares to save themselves and couldn’t?  The Texas Rangers. Then they hired CRG.  So, you know.

Mike Trout has been really good at baseball lately

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“Water wet,” “Sky blue,” “Dog bites man” and “Mike Trout good” are not exactly newsworthy sentiments, but once in a while you have to state the obvious just so you can look back later and make sure you were, in the moment, aware of the obvious.

And to be fair, “Mike Trout good” is underselling the Angels outfielder lately. He’s on the greatest tear of his great career lately, and dang it, that’s worthy of a few words on this blog.

Last night Trout went a mere 1-for-1, but that’s because the Diamondbacks were smart enough not to pitch to him too much, walking him twice. There was no one on base the first time he came up and he got a free pass. There was a guy on first but two outs the second time, so he was once again not given much to hit and took his base again. Arizona was not so lucky the third time. The bases were loaded and there was nowhere to put Trout. He smacked the first pitch he saw for a two-run single. They probably shoulda just walked him anyway, limiting the damage to one. The last time up he reached on catcher’s interference. Maybe Arizona figured that literally grabbing the bat from him with a catcher’s mitt was the best bet?

If so you can’t blame them, really. Not with the month he’s had. In June, Trout is hitting .448/.554/.776 with five homers. He currently leads the league in the following categories: home runs (23), runs (60), walks (64), on-base percentage (.469), OPS (1.158) OPS+ (219), total bases (179) and intentional walks (9). He currently has a bWAR of 6.5. WAR, in case you did not know, is a cumulative stat. When he won the 2014 MVP Award, he “only” had 7.6 for the entire year.

Sadly, one man does not a team make, so the Angels are only 9-8 in the month of June and have fallen far back of the red-hot Houston Astros and Seattle Mariners in the division race. For this reason I suspect a lot of people are going to do what they’ve long done and overlook Mike Trout’s sheer dominance or, even more ridiculously, claim he is overrated or something (believe me, I’ve seen it even this month).

Feel free to ignore those people and concentrate instead on the greatest baseball player in the game today, who has somehow managed to up his game in recent weeks.