What do we really know about Mr. Met?

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Richard Sandomir has a nice story in the New York Times today about Mr. Met. About his history. About how beloved he is. And about how, despite all of the turmoil the Mets have found themselves in over the years, Mr. Met has always been there, smiling and spreading good will:

Mr. Met, then, can be seen as the one blameless figure in Flushing. Mr. Met doesn’t give up five runs in four innings. He doesn’t lose fly balls in the sun. He hasn’t lost his home run stroke. He didn’t throw in his finances with Bernard L. Madoff. He didn’t design Citi Field. He is, in his way, harmlessly pure. And as a result, arguably more popular than ever.

That’s one theory.  Another theory:  with a few exceptions, Mr. Met has been around for every bad thing that has ever happened to the Mets since he was introduced in 1964.

He’s the constant. You can’t blame Fred Wilpon bad stuff that happened in the 60s. You can’t blame Daryl Strawberry for the Mets recent late season collapses.  You can’t blame David Wright for the aborted dynasty of the mid-to-late 80s. You can’t blame George Foster for the financial turmoil in which the team currently finds itself.

But Mr. Met has seen it all.  He has sat back quietly — too quietly if you ask me — while others have taken the fall.

There are no accidents people. And there should be no sacred cows.  It’s high time someone got to the bottom of what, exactly, Mr. Met knew and when did he know it.

B.J. Upton is going by B.J. Upton again

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Outfielder B.J. Upton went by the name B.J., short for Bossman Junior, through the 2014 season. His father Manny was known as Bossman, hence Bossman Junior. Upton decided he wanted to be referred to by his birth name Melvin starting in 2015, saying that everyone except baseball fans knew him by that name. Now, he’s back to B.J., Scott Boeck of USA TODAY Sports reports.

For those keeping score at home, Upton is the artist formerly and currently known as B.J.

Upton, 34, hasn’t played in the majors since 2016. He signed a minor league deal with the Indians in December 2017 but was released in the middle of last March and wasn’t able to latch on with another team. It seems unlikely he finds his way back to the majors.