Albert Pujols’ contract is worth up to $265.75 million

26 Comments

Today the players’ association and MLB officially signed off on Albert Pujols’ contract with the Angels, revealing a few interesting details about the deal.

Pujols is guaranteed at least $240 million over 10 seasons, but the contract could be worth as much as $265.75 million.

When he’s finished playing Pujols will begin a 10-year “personal services” contract with the Angels that pays $1 million per year, which isn’t counted as payroll for luxury tax purposes because it doesn’t kick in until he’s retired.

There are also sizable bonuses for reaching milestones, including $3 million for 3,000 hits and $7 million for 763 homers, and another $875,000 in total incentives each season for regular season MVP, ALCS MVP, World Series MVP, Gold Glove, Silver Slugger, and All-Star selections.

And the deal is also heavily backloaded, paying Pujols just $12 million in 2012 and $16 million in 2013 before his salary rises to $23 million in 2014 with an annual $1 million bump each year through 2021:

2012: $12 million
2013: $16 million
2014: $23 million
2015: $24 million
2016: $25 million
2017: $26 million
2018: $27 million
2019: $28 million
2020: $29 million
2021: $30 million

The thought of paying $30 million to a 41-year-old Pujols in 2021 is pretty scary, but the Angels’ new television deal makes even that contractual monstrosity a relative drop in the revenue bucket and who knows what MLB’s money-making landscape will look like a decade from now.

The Dodgers do not have a general manager, but they have an assistant general manager

Getty Images
2 Comments

LAS VEGAS — Farhan Zaidi left his job as the general manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers to become the president of baseball operations for the San Francisco Giants. While Dodgers president Andrew Friedman remains at the top of the baseball operations department, Zaidi’s departure has left the Dodgers without a general manager. It happens. It also happens that the Dodgers do not plan to replace Zaidi with a new general manager any time soon. They just said so last week.

They do, however, have an assistant general manager now. It’s Jeff Kingston, late of the Seattle Mariners, where he served as Jerry Dipoto’s assistant. Now he is an assistant with no one, nominally, to assist. Seems like some sort of dividing by zero error, philosophically speaking, but we’ll just assume it’ll sort itself out.

Two less cosmic takeaways from this: 1. Kingston is an analytics guy who has typically advised the wheeler-dealer — Dipoto — so it’s fairly safe to assume he’ll do that in Los Angeles too; and 2. that a team is happy to proceed without a general manager should tell you where general managers, well, in general, stand in this age of title inflation in baseball front offices.

I imagine that, after some time in the organization, Kingston will be named the actual general manager with no real change in his duties, further underscoring that, in this day and age, the title of GM is like the value of a Zimbabwean dollar.