Carlos Silva agrees to minor-league contract with Red Sox

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Carlos Silva spent the final season of his four-year, $48 million contract at Triple-A and the 32-year-old right-hander will likely begin 2012 there as well after agreeing to a minor-league contract with the Red Sox.

Rob Bradford of WEEI.com reports that Silva will earn a prorated share of $1 million if the Red Sox call him up to the majors at some point, but in the meantime he’ll join the collection of minor-league pitching depth that includes Brandon Duckworth, Charlie Haeger, Will Inman, Doug Mathis, Tony Pena Jr., Chorye Spoone, Jesse Carlson, Rich Hill, and Justin Thomas.

Silva was terrible in Seattle after signing his big contract, prompting the Mariners to trade him to the Cubs for Milton Bradley in a swap of disgruntled, high-salaried disappointments. He turned things around in Chicago, throwing 113 innings with a 4.21 ERA and 80/24 K/BB ratio in 2010, but wore out of his welcome with the Cubs as well and was released. Silva spent last season in the Yankees’ minor-league system, making seven starts with a 2.75 ERA.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.