Edwin Jackson wants a five-year, $60 million contract

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Prince Fielder remains unsigned and another high-profile Scott Boras client, Edwin Jackson, is also still on the market.

And if this report from ESPN New York is accurate we know why, as Wallace Matthews writes that Jackson is said to be seeking a five-year deal worth approximately $60 million.

C.J. Wilson got $77.5 million for five seasons from the Angels and Mark Buehrle got $48 million for four seasons from the Marlins, but they went off the market before options for starting pitchers dwindled and have more impressive track records than Jackson, who posted a 3.79 ERA in 200 innings last season and has a 4.46 career mark.

Of course, Jackson is also just 28 years old and because of that a five-season contract could make sense … assuming a team wants to make a long-term commitment to a guy who’s pitched for six teams in nine years.

Matthews reports that the Yankees definitely won’t be that team unless Jackson’s demands drop, because they just don’t have room in the budget.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.