The Braves won’t trade Jair Jurrjens within the division

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The Braves seem pretty set on trading Jair Jurrjens. I’m OK with that. They have oodles of starting pitching coming up through the system and they’re not going to be able to keep both Jurrjens and Tommy Hanson as each of them get expensive.  Trade JJ and get a shortstop or a bat or some good depth or something, right?

But they won’t trade him just anywhere. Jon Heyman says that the Braves will not trade Jair Jurrjens within the division, thereby rendering inquiries from the Marlins and Nationals moot. I get that. As a lot of people say, you don’t want your former player to come back and haunt you over and over.

Although in this case I choose to believe it’s more like the rules that apply to selling a used car to someone you’re gonna have to see a lot of. I mean, I like Jurrjens, but I have little faith that his knees aren’t going to continue to give him trouble or that his strikeout rate is going to come back to bite him and that ERA is gonna balloon up.  Maybe Frank Wren doesn’t care, but I think it would be awkward to see the exec you ripped off 18 times a year.

World Series Umpires announced

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In the Major League Baseball system, the people are entertained by two separate yet equally important groups. The players who play the game and the umpires who call the balls, strikes and outs. These are their stories.

Wait, that’s not true. They’re not equally important and we certainly don’t want to hear the umpires’ stories. If the stories are about the umpires it usually that means they’ve screwed up.

Not always, though! In 2013, you may recall, I wrote a story about an umpire who made a much talked about call in a World Series game that (a) happened to be right, even if it was much-debated; and (b) his story is one I’ve always found compelling, even if he’s most famous for a call he got wrong.

Jim Joyce, though, an umpire who was widely admired and respected despite his famous blunders, is one of the few exceptions to the rule about what it means to know an umpires’ name. Most of the time we’re all lucky — umpires included — if the introductions are the first and last time we hear of them.

Here they are for the 2018 World Series, with Game 1 assignments noted:

Home: Tim Timmons
1B: Kerwin Danley
2B: Ted Barrett — Crew Chief
3B: Chad Fairchild
LF: Jeff Nelson
RF:Jim Reynolds
Replay, Games 1-2: Fieldin Culbreth
Replay, Game 3-End: Tim Timmons