BBWAA members don’t seem terribly pleased by the BBWAA’s statement on Bill Conlin

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As Matthew noted last night, the BBWAA issued a statement in the wake of the Bill Conlin ugliness.  It was strange to see it and, in my mind, pretty ill-advised.

Why say anything now? Given the gravity of the allegations, who gives a damn about what it all means for the Spink Award?  While I appreciate the need not to pile on someone the second allegations surface, if the Penn State and Syracuse scandals showed us anything, it showed us that you don’t just jump out front and defend someone accused of this stuff as a matter of reflex either. And what the BBWAA statement did was to defend Conlin, at least in a small way.

Obviously the BBWAA did not convene a conclave of its members in the space of a couple hours last night to get their input on the statement. And, not surprisingly, some members are making a point today to say that the statement does not speak for them.  Andy Martino of the New York Daily News even wrote an article about it:

Philadelphia Daily News editor Larry Platt, who accepted Conlin’s retirement Tuesday, told the Inquirer: “I can’t even begin to express the shock, sadness, and outrage I feel by what Bill Conlin is alleged to have done.”

That statement was clear about both the troubling nature of the allegations, and the fact they remain just that — allegations. I wish that my organization. the BBWAA, had achieved a similar balance.

I know this is a horrible and difficult situation for anyone to manage, but I agree with Martino: the BBWAA didn’t manage it well.

Japanese Baseball to begin June 19

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Japanese League commissioner Atsushi Saito announced that Japan’s professional baseball season will open on June 19. Teams can being practice games on June 2. There will be no fans. Indeed, the league has not yet even begun to seriously discuss a plan for fans to begin attending games, though that may happen eventually.

The season will begin three months after its originally scheduled opening day of March 20. It will be 120 games long. Teams in each six-team league — the Central League and Pacific League — will play 24 games against each league opponent. There will be no interleague play and no all-star game.

The announcement came in the wake of a national state of emergency being lifted for both Tokyo and the island of Hokkaido. The rest of the country emerged from the state of emergency earlier this month. This will allow the Japanese leagues to follow leagues in South Korea and Taiwan which have been playing for several weeks.

In the United States, Major League Baseball is hoping to resume spring training in mid June before launching a shortened regular season in early July. That plan is contingent on the league and the players’ union coming to an agreement on both financial arrangements and safety protocols for a 2020 season. Negotiations on both are ongoing. Major League Baseball will, reportedly, make a formal proposal about player compensation tomorrow.