No, you don’t re-vote the MVP award in light of Ryan Braun’s positive test

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You figured someone would say this. That someone is Fox’s Jon Paul Morosi, who makes the argument that the BBWAA should be allowed to re-vote the NL MVP award if Ryan Braun’s positive test for testosterone is upheld on appeal.

At the outset, it’s worth noting that the BBWAA has no intention whatsoever of doing this. It’s not the official position of the organization. It’s simply Morosi’s personal view. So let’s take a look at that view.

The leading premise — really the only premise — of the argument is that he doesn’t want the sports writers to feel like schmucks:

The BBWAA awards — MVP, Cy Young, Rookie of the Year and Manager of the Year — are the most significant individual honors in North American professional sports. They have more permanence, and inspire greater debates, than similar honors in the NFL, NBA and NHL. And the voters should be able to say their process was just. Ultimately, it is up to us — the writers. They are our awards. We vote on them. We present them to the players. We have license to determine the procedure by which winners are determined.

He basically says “oh those poor sportswriters who didn’t know Braun may have been taking banned substances deserve another chance.”  But he acknowledges that the positive test allegedly came after the season was over and the voting was all done, so how exactly were the writers hoodwinked?

Morosi goes on to note that the BBWAA didn’t go back and change the votes for when Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Alex Rodriguez and others won postseason awards. The distinction: that was a long time ago and the voting for Braun was recent. It’s unclear what the cutoff is supposed to be. A year? Three years? When the writers stop feeling hurt? I think that might be it, actually.

Morosi is allowed to feel however he feels about this. But it’s pretty clear that this is about just that — feeling — and not about some objective idea of justice and propriety when it comes to postseason awards. This is about throwing out all of the presents your boyfriend bought you two days after the breakup.

And because of that it’s just the latest reason why I’m coming around to the idea that the sportswriters shouldn’t be in the business of handing out these awards in the first place. There’s too much narrative and emotion read into it. And it really doesn’t have a place.

Ryan Braun was the NL MVP. It happened and it’s history and if it came at a time when he was using banned substances, then that’s part of the history too. The sports writers should then do what they do best: place that history in context and tell the stories to readers.  Not act like this has anything to do with them.

Addison Russell’s wife Melisa comes forward with details about years of abuse

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Last year, Cubs shortstop Addison Russell‘s wife Melisa made an Instagram post in which she accused her husband of cheating on her. Melisa’s friend added a comment in which she alleged Addison had been physically abusive towards Melisa. Addison denied the allegations. Major League Baseball started an investigation, but Melisa chose not to cooperate. Addison was not punished and the issue mostly went away.

On Wednesday, Melisa posted on her WordPress blog, which is linked on her Instagram with over 44,000 followers. In the post, Melisa details years of emotional, verbal, and physical abuse from Addison. Addison’s behavior, as detailed by Melisa, checks many of the boxes listed by The National Domestic Violence Hotline. As the abuse went on, Melisa says she suffered from depression. Eventually, she filed for divorce and began to regain control of her life, ultimately gaining the courage to come forward with what she had been through.

Read Melisa’s post if you want to know the full details of what went on. The details may be triggering for those of you who have also suffered abuse or are sensitive to the idea.

The Cubs and Major League Baseball should attempt to speak with Melisa to develop a strategy moving forward. Melisa may not cooperate again, which is her right and would not in any way diminish her allegations. If Melssa agrees, the Cubs should suspend Russell immediately and indefinitely. Failing that, Major League Baseball should suspend Russell immediately and indefinitely.

Victims of abuse, usually cisgender women and transgender people, have nothing material to gain by coming forward with allegations, particularly against someone in the public spotlight with legions of fans who will defend their favorite player to an unhealthy degree. Those who do come forward with details of their abuse should be given the benefit of the doubt and applauded for their courage.