An updated look at what’s left in free agency

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Here’s an up-to-date list of how the top 111 free agents have fared to date. Note that the list below doesn’t include Yu Darvish or Yoenis Cespedes, two of the remaining gems available to major league teams.

1. Albert Pujols (Cardinals): Angels – 10 years, $254 million
2. Prince Fielder (Brewers)
3. Jose Reyes (Mets): Marlins – 6 years, $106 million
4. C.J. Wilson (Rangers): Angels – 5 years, $77.5 million
5. Jimmy Rollins (Phillies)
6. Jonathan Papelbon (Red Sox): Phillies – 4 years, $50 million
7. Mark Buehrle (White Sox): Marlins – 4 years, $58 million
8. Carlos Beltran (Giants)
9. Edwin Jackson (Cardinals)
10. Aramis Ramirez (Cubs)
11. David Ortiz (Red Sox): Red Sox – accepted arbitration
12. Heath Bell (Padres): Marlins – 3 years, $27 million
13. Michael Cuddyer (Twins)
14. Ryan Madson (Phillies)
15. Hiroki Kuroda (Dodgers)
16. Francisco Rodriguez (Brewers): Brewers – accepted arbitration
17. Josh Willingham (Athletics)
18. Roy Oswalt (Phillies)
19. Jason Kubel (Twins)
20. Javier Vazquez (Marlins)
21. Paul Maholm (Pirates)
22. Kelly Johnson (Blue Jays): Blue Jays – accepted arbitration
23. Hisashi Iwakuma (Japan)
24. Francisco Cordero (Reds)
25. Grady Sizemore (Indians): Indians – 1 year, $5 million
26. Erik Bedard (Red Sox): Pirates – 1 year, $4.5 million
27. Carlos Pena (Cubs)
28. Tsuyoshi Wada (Japan)
29. Coco Crisp (Athletics)
30. Casey Kotchman (Rays)
31. David DeJesus (Athletics): Cubs – 2 years, $10 million
32. Rafael Furcal (Cardinals)
33. Derrek Lee (Pirates)
34. Joel Pineiro (Angels)
35. Clint Barmes (Astros): Pirates – 2 years, $10.5 million
36. Jason Marquis (D-backs)
37. Aaron Hill (D-backs): D-backs – 2 years, $11 million
38. Johnny Damon (Rays)
39. Bruce Chen (Royals): Royals – 2 years, $9 million
40. Joe Nathan (Twins): Rangers – 2 years, $14.75 million
41. Bartolo Colon (Yankees)
42. Vladimir Guerrero (Orioles)
43. Cody Ross (Giants)
44. Aaron Harang (Padres): Dodgers – 2 years, $12 million
45. Jonathan Broxton (Dodgers): Royals – 1 year, $4.5 million
46. Ryan Ludwick (Pirates)
47. Matt Capps (Twins): Twins – 1 year, $4.75 million
48. Ramon Hernandez (Reds): Rockies – 2 years, $6.4 million
49. Mark Ellis (Rockies): Dodgers – 2 years, $8.75 million
50. Freddy Garcia (Yankees): Yankees – 1 year, $4 million
51. Wilson Betemit (Tigers)
52. Darren Oliver (Rangers)
53. Frank Francisco (Blue Jays): Mets – 2 years, $12 million
54. Juan Rivera (Dodgers): Dodgers – 1 year, $4.5 million
55. Chris Capuano (Mets): Dodgers – 2 years, $10 million
56. Hideki Matsui (Athletics)
57. Brad Lidge (Phillies)
58. J.D. Drew (Red Sox)
59. Ramon Santiago (Tigers): Tigers – 2 years, $4 million
60. Juan Pierre (White Sox)
61. Chien-Ming Wang (Nationals): Nationals – 1 year, $4 million
62. Alex Gonzalez (Braves): Brewers
63. Ryan Doumit (Pirates): Twins – 1 year, $3 million
64. Jim Thome (Indians): Phillies – 1 year, $1.25 million
65. Kerry Wood (Cubs)
66. Rich Harden (Athletics)
67. Casey Blake (Dodgers)
68. Octavio Dotel (Cardinals): Tigers – 1 year, $3.5 million
69. Magglio Ordonez (Tigers)
70. Jon Garland (Dodgers)
71. Yuniesky Betancourt (Brewers)
72. Kosuke Fukudome (Indians)
73. Jamey Carroll (Dodgers): Twins – 2 years, $6.75 million
74. Brad Penny (Tigers)
75. LaTroy Hawkins (Brewers): Angels – 1 year, $3 million
76. Rod Barajas (Dodgers): Pirates – 1 year, $4 million
77. Chad Qualls (Padres)
78. Jeff Francis (Royals)
79. Raul Ibanez (Phillies)
80. Jon Rauch (Blue Jays): Mets – 1 year, $3.5 million
81. Chris Snyder (Pirates)
82. Jonny Gomes (Nationals)
83. Takashi Saito (Brewers)
84. Jorge Posada (Yankees)
85. Mike Gonzalez (Rangers)
86. Laynce Nix (Nationals): Phillies – 2 years, $2.5 million
87. Nate McLouth (Braves): Pirates – 1 year, $1.5 million
88. Livan Hernandez (Nationals)
89. Michael Wuertz (Athletics)
90. Jason Varitek (Red Sox)
91. Jerry Hairston Jr. (Brewers): Dodgers – 2 years, $6 million
92. Andruw Jones (Yankees)
93. Fernando Rodney (Angels)
94. Jason Isringhausen (Mets)
95. Willie Bloomquist (D-backs): D-backs – 2 years, $3.8 million
96. Scott Hairston (Mets)
97. Kevin Millwood (Rockies)
98. Todd Coffey (Nationals)
99. Kelly Shoppach (Rays)
100. Ben Sheets (N/A)
101. Ronny Cedeno (Pirates)
102. Lyle Overbay (D-backs): D-backs – 1 year, $1 million
103. Juan Cruz (Rays)
104. Aaron Cook (Rockies)
105. Reed Johnson (Cubs)
106. Guillermo Mota (Giants)
107. Ivan Rodriguez (Nationals)
108. Zach Duke (D-backs)
109. Dan Wheeler (Red Sox)
110. Mark DeRosa (Giants)
111. Chris Young (Mets)

Red Sox survive back-and-forth affair with Astros, win 8-6 to take 3-1 lead in ALCS

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Game 4 of the ALCS on Wednesday night between the Red Sox and Astros was a thrilling back-and-forth affair with seven lead changes. Ultimately, the Red Sox emerged victorious with a hard-fought 7-5 victory.

The Red Sox wasted no time getting on the board, plating two runs in the top of the first inning against Charlie Morton thanks to a walk, hit-by-pitch, wild pitch, and a Rafael Devers single. In the bottom half, José Altuve hit what appeared to be a game-tying two-run home run to right field off of Rick Porcello. Mookie Betts leaped and was interfered with by fans in the stands, so Altuve was called out instead. The ruling was upheld after review.

In the bottom of the second, the Astros officially scored their first run when Carlos Correa knocked home a run with a single. The Red Sox immediately got it back when Xander Bogaerts doubled in a run in the top of the third, running the score to 3-1. In what would become a trend, the Astros also responded as George Springer drilled a solo homer and Josh Reddick hit an RBI single of his own to tie the game at 3-3. Tony Kemp added a solo homer down the right field line in the fourth to put the Astros on top for the first time. Bogaerts hit another RBI single in the top of the fifth to re-tie the game at 4-4. Correa followed suit in the bottom half, hitting his second RBI single of the game to give the Astros back the lead.

Jackie Bradley, Jr., who hit a soul-crushing grand slam off of Roberto Osuna in Game 3, hit another homer in Game 4, a two-run shot in the sixth off of Josh James. In the seventh, the Red Sox loaded the bases with two outs and Lance McCullers, Jr. entered to try to put out the fire. He did not, briefly, walking Brock Holt to force in a run and make the score 7-5. McCullers did end up getting out of the inning without any further damage. Just for good measure, though, J.D. Martinez tacked on a run in the eighth with an RBI single to make it 8-5.

Ryan Brasier got five outs and Matt Barnes one in the sixth and seventh. Manager Alex Cora decided to call on Craig Kimbrel for a six-out save when the bottom of the eighth rolled around. The 2018 postseason hasn’t been kind to Kimbrel as he had given up runs in all three of his appearances. Kimbrel gave up hits to the first three batters he faced. Kemp led off with a single but he tried to stretch it into a double and was thrown out at second base by Betts. Kimbrel then hit Alex Bregman with a pitch and surrendered a double to George Springer, putting runners at second and third with one out. Altuve knocked in a run with a ground out to make it 8-6, but Kimbrel saw his way out of the inning by striking out Marwin González.

In the ninth, Cora decided to keep Kimbrel in the ballgame despite his continued struggles. Kimbrel got Yuli Gurriel to pop up to start the inning, but then issued back-to-back walks to Reddick and Correa. Kimbrel got out number two by getting Brian McCann to fly out to right field, then walked Tony Kemp to load the bases. Cora decided to stay with Kimbrel as Bregman came to the plate. Kimbrel threw a first-pitch, 97 MPH fastball that Bregman laced into shallow left field. Andrew Benintendi charged in and dived, catching the ball just in time to save the game, ending it for an 8-6 victory. Of the 18 half-innings, the two sides failed to score in only seven of them.

The Red Sox, now up three games to one in the ALCS, will try to close it out on Thursday night in Houston. If the Red Sox win, they will return to the World Series for the first time since 2013.