UPDATE: Dodgers sign Jerry Hairston Jr. to two-year, $6 million deal

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6:25 p.m. EST update: FOXSports.com’s Ken Rosenthal says the deal is done. Hairston will receive $6 million over two years, plus incentives, from the Dodgers. He’ll serve as a backup in both the infield and outfield, and he could push Juan Uribe for playing time at third base if Uribe struggles to bounce back from an awful 2011 season.

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Ned Colletti: “Hey, Jerry. I think you’re great. I know there are a lot of teams out there who would love to have you around next season. I tell ya what I’m going to do. I’m going to offer you a two-year deal.”

Jerry Hairston Jr.: “Two years, Ned? I’m 35 years old, I’ve been in the big leagues 14 seasons and I’ve never had a multiyear deal. What’s the catch?”

Ned: “Catch? No catch. Well, I mean, you’ll have to settle for $1 million next year. But I can promise you a cool $5 million in 2012.”

Jerry: “OK, sure, why the heck not?”

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Hairston is coming off one of his better years, having hit .270/.344/.383 in 337 at-bats for the Nationals and Brewers, and while he’s not much of a shortstop, his versatility does make him pretty valuable, even if it’s more the kind of value that leads teams to offer him one-year, $2 million contracts. If this gets done, it could potentially be the first time he’s spent two full years with the same team since his tenure with the Orioles ended after the 2004 season.

Hunter Pence is mashing for the Rangers

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Hunter Pence was thought to be on his way to retirement after a lackluster 2018 season with the Giants. As he entered his mid-30’s, Pence spent a considerable amount of time on the injured list, playing in 389 out of 648 possible regular season games with the Giants from 2015-18.

Pence, however, kept his career going, inking a minor league deal with the Rangers in February. He performed very well in spring training, earning a spot on the Opening Day roster. Pence hasn’t stopped hitting.

Entering Monday night’s game against the Mariners, Pence was batting .299/.358/.619 with eight home runs and 28 RBI in 109 plate appearances, mostly as a DH. Statcast agrees that Pence has been mashing the ball. He has an average exit velocity of 93.3 MPH this season, which would obliterate his marks in each of the previous four seasons since Statcast became a thing. His career average exit velocity is 89.8 MPH. He has “barreled” the ball 10.4 percent of the time, well above his 6.2 percent average.

What Pence did to a baseball in the seventh inning of Monday’s game, then, shouldn’t come as a surprise.

That’s No. 9 on the year for Pence. Statcast measured it at 449 feet and 108.3 MPH off the bat. Not only is Pence not retired, he may be a lucrative trade chip for the Rangers leading up to the trade deadline at the end of July.