Wily Mo Pena signs two-year deal with Japanese team

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Wily Mo Pena’s comeback attempt never quite took hold, as he totaled just 120 plate appearances for the Mariners and Diamondbacks, and now the flawed but powerful 29-year-old has agreed to a two-year contract to play in Japan for the Softbank Hawks.

Earlier this week reports pegged Pena’s contract as being worth around $5 million, so it’s tough to blame him for choosing Japan over trying to stick in American long enough to make $500,000 or so in a season.

Pena has never lost his 30-homer power, going deep seven times in just 113 at-bats this year, but his complete lack of plate discipline and defensive ability have held him back since initial success from 2004-2006.

Softbank are the reigning Japanese champions and it wouldn’t be surprising if Pena puts up some monster numbers. He hit .250 with 84 homers and a .748 OPS in 599 games as a major leaguer, averaging 25 homers per 500 at-bats.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.